Category Archives: Health and Wellness

Grapevine Water Report

Our Drinking Water Meets or Exceeds All Federal (EPA) Drinking Water Requirements

Goal_3Providing safe and reliable drinking water is our highest priority. We are proud to produce and deliver water that meets or exceeds state and federal standards. This report is a summary of the quality of the water we provide our customers. The analysis was made by using data from the most recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) required tests and is presented in the following pages. We hope this information helps you become more knowledgeable about what is in your drinking water.

Special Notice for the Elderly, Infants, Cancer Patients, People with HIV/AIDS or Other Immune Problems:

You may be more vulnerable than the general population to certain microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, in drinking water. Infants, some elderly, or immunocompromised persons such as those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer; those who have undergone organ transplants; those who are undergoing treatment with steroids; and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders can be particularly at risk from infections. You should seek advice about drinking water from your physician or health care provider. Additional guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800.426.4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/

All Drinking Water May Contain Contaminants

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. When drinking water meets federal standards, there may not be any health based benefits to purchasing bottled water or point of use devices. More information about contaminants and potential health effects may be obtained by calling EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800.426.4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/

Awards

The City of Grapevine received the EPA Award for Excellence in 1992, 1995, and 1998 for the best maintained and operated water system for Region VI for water systems of similar size. Region VI consists of Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. In 1991, 1998, 2001 and 2004, the City of Grapevine’s water was awarded the best tasting water award in North Central Texas, by the North Texas Laboratory Association. The City of Grapevine was awarded the best tasting water in Texas in March 2002. In 1994 and 2013, the Trinity River Authority water was awarded the best tasting water in North Central Texas by the North Texas Laboratory Association. The Trinity River Authority was awarded the best tasting water in Texas in March 2014.

Where do we get our drinking water?

Sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material. It can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants – such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants – such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff.
  • Industrial or domestic wastewater discharges- oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides – which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from stations, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Radioactive contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Grapevine uses surface water from Lake Grapevine and purchased water from the Trinity River Authority (TRA). TRA raw water is pumped from Cedar Creek Reservoir and Richland-Chambers Reservoir into Lake Arlington.

A Source Water Susceptibility Assessment for your drinking water source(s) is currently being updated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This information describes the susceptibility and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions. The information contained in the assessment allows us to focus source water protection strategies.

TCEQ classified the risks to our source water as “High” for most contaminants. “High” susceptibility means events or activities near sources of the City of Grapevine drinking water make it very likely that chemical constituents may come into contact with our source water. It does not mean there are any health risks present.

For more information on source water assessments and protection efforts of our system, call 817.410.3330.

For more information about your sources of water, please refer to the Source Water Assessment Viewer available at the following URL: http://www.tceq.texas.gov/gis/swaview

Further details about sources and source-water assessments are available in Drinking Water Watch at the following URL: http://dww2.tceq.texas.gov/DWW/

Lake Water Treatment

At the Grapevine and TRA water treatment plants, the lake water goes through several treatment processes where chemicals such as chlorine, ozone, alum, fluoride, caustic soda, ammonia, potassium permanganate and polymer are added to purify the water. After the water is purified, it is pumped into your homes through more than 299 miles of distribution pipelines.

Editor’s Corner: It may not be dementia

By Stacey Doud

dementia-6signsabuse690x400We haven’t posted a whole lot on The Grapevine Source lately because we were dealing with a family health issue…and I have to say I learned a LOT.

My mother is a total morning person. When I couldn’t get her on the phone by 9am last Saturday, I drove to her apartment, which is about seven minutes away.

I got there and she was indeed in bed, which at 9am is unheard of for her. Everything was dark. I was able to wake her but she was disoriented and basically couldn’t even sit up in bed. She was trying to speak, but it came out in a whisper and made no sense.

So I called 9-1-1. Fortunately, a fire station is right down the road and the EMS/Fire guys were there within minutes. They assessed her, and her vital signs were perfect. But it was obvious that she was not herself, so they took her to Baylor Scott and White Hospital.

To make a long story short, it turned out that my mom had a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI). I learned that infections like UTIs can mimic the symptoms of dementia in the elderly. WHO KNEW? The Occupational Therapist explained that the process looks like this: the person slowly stops hydrating as much as he/she should, as well as stops eating right (skipping meals altogether at times); he/she starts to feel yucky generally; then the mental symptoms can start. In my mom’s case, her psychiatric symptoms started sometime late Friday night/early Saturday morning because she was totally lucid and fine when I spoke to her Friday around 5pm.

The infection causes blood to flow to that area so that white blood cells can try to fight it, and some of that blood comes from the brain. When there’s not enough blood to the brain, the person gets confused and dementia-like. I found a pretty good article on this issue at SeniorLiving.org:

“One of the many unseen, hard-to-detect dangers that senior citizens face today is urinary tract infections, more often known as UTIs.  Though easily treatable, the symptoms of UTIs in the elderly can often mimic those of other more serious conditions, like dementia. Given that UTIs are one of the most frequent, hidden infections seniors suffer from, it is important to be able to differentiate them from other illnesses, then isolate and eliminate them.

“Older individuals are vulnerable to UTIs for several reasons. The biggest culprit is an immune system weakened by time that increases susceptibility to any infection…Seniors are also more prone to UTIs because they get an assortment of ailments that cause urinary retention.  There are certain health conditions they face that make it harder to pass urine, such as diabetes, kidney infections, and kidney stones.  In addition to slowing the process of urinating, diabetes raises glucose in the urine, which also increases the likelihood of a UTI. An older person’s inability to urinate properly can then necessitate a catheter, which is difficult to keep sanitary, making them even more vulnerable to the same infection.”

My mom is now back home and doing well. She uses a shower chair now to prevent falls, as her physical body is still a bit unstable. Home health comes by three times a week, and I check on her every day. She wants to maintain her independence, but she’s 73 years old. Fortunately, she is understanding of her limits. She makes a point to drink plenty of water (dehydration/electrolyte imbalances can add to the cognitive symptoms), and eats three meals a day, even if one meal is a nutrition drink.

We learned a lot, and want to prevent this from happening again. I like to think I am a biology nerd and know more than the average bear about how the body works, but I did not know this. It flabbergasted me.

I wanted to share it here so that our readers will know, and hopefully this knowledge can prevent or quickly treat this medical issue in at least one other person…hopefully more.

Have a blessed day and feel free to email questions to me if you have any. I will do my best to answer them (based on my experience) or ask our home health nurse if I do not know the answer.

Indiana school district turns unused cafeteria food into take-home meals for kids

By ED ERNSTES, WSBT 22 Reporter

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Elkhart schools are teaming up with a South Bend-based food rescue for a pilot program. (WSBT 22 photo)

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WSBT) – An Indiana school district is taking steps to make sure kids have enough to eat.

Elkhart Community Schools students usually get breakfast and lunch at school, but on the weekends at home, they may be without food.

That’s where the South Bend-based non-profit Cultivate comes in: it provides weekend meals to a small group of students in the elementary school pilot program.

Read more from ABC 3340…

2 more blood pressure drug recalls for cancer risk; 4 in one week

Author: Travis Pittman

recall_pills_1531753469912_5798293_ver1.0_640_360Pharmaceutical companies issued two more recalls for blood pressure medications on Friday because of potential cancer-causing impurities, making it four recalls in one week. They are part of an ongoing string of recalls that started in July 2018.

Torrent Pharmaceuticals Limited recalled 60 lots of Losartan potassium tablets USP and 54 lots of Losartan potassium/hydrochlorothiazide tablets due to the detection of trace amounts of N-Methylnitrosobutyric acid (NMBA). Torrent said it was only recalling those lots in which NMBA was above the acceptable daily intake levels released by the FDA.

Read more from WFAA…

You Can Now Take A ‘Rage Yoga’ Class That Comes With Beer Breaks And Lots Of Swearing

For many, yoga has been a way to reduce stress and promote relaxation. For others, having to breathe, inhale, smell lavender, and keep silent can be even more stress-inducing than calming. So, instead of having a regular ol’ “namaste” yoga class, there’s a brand new kind of yoga class on the market catered to those who need to scream it out.

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Rage Yoga, according to CBS News, originated in Texas by yoga instructor Ashley Duzich.

Read more from Mommy Needs Vodka…

Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann Health System call off merger

 

GCS-2018-01-17-2Two of Texas’ major not-for-profit health systems—Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann Health System—announced Feb. 5 they will no longer pursue a merger announced in a letter of intent on Oct. 1 that would have affected 30 counties throughout the state.

“After months of thoughtful exploration, we have decided to discontinue talks of a merger between our two systems,” a Feb. 5 news release from Baylor Scott & White stated. “Ultimately, we have concluded that as strong, successful organizations, we are capable of achieving our visions for the future without merging at this time.”

Read more from Community Impact…

CBD American Shaman in Grapevine now open

By 

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Photo courtesy of Lance Griffin

CBD American Shaman opened Feb. 2 at 303 Northwest Hwy., Ste. C, Grapevine. The business sells cannabidiol oil, or CBD oil, which is derived from industrial hemp and can be used as a natural remedy for relieving pain, stress and anxiety. 817-722-6100. www.facebook.com/grapevinecbd or https://cbdamericanshaman.com/

Read more from Community Impact…

Special Assignment: Stroke

By Chris Daigle

As a journalist, I’ve been in some unusual situations. I’ve flown with the Blue Angels in a C-130 going straight up, an adventure which earned me the flight name, “Chili Man,” having survived a bowl of chili right before the flight without incident. I’ve traveled at 200 miles an hour on a race track and have been upside down in stunt planes. The greatest story ever assigned to me came without warning, and not over the phone or email.

I’ve had a stroke.

chris in therapy

Chris in Therapy

I didn’t think much of it at first, as I pulled into a now-defunct clinic, thinking I could just get a shot or something to make this go away. As the ambulance took me to the hospital, I was gripped by one thought: this is bad.

I learned about hospitals, doctors and medicines very quickly, and hospital life became a new way of living for me. Thinking about the next examination was the overriding guide for my day. Little did I know that a vast network of friends and family mobilized on my behalf behind the scenes. My employer and his staff came to the hospital. Others worked to help me establish state and federal benefits.

I constantly thought, “What is this all about?” in those first few days, wondering why my left side wouldn’t work. From the beginning, I had to realize that this was really me going through this, and it wouldn’t just go away, like other calamities in my life. My nickname at work is,” M.O.D.,” or Master of Disaster because I’ve had so many close calls over the years.

Apparently, because of the way I was eating, the term, “Master of Donuts” fit also. I was eating all the wrong things, and it caught up with me. Too much Taco Bell; too much Mountain Dew. The stress didn’t help either. I’m like a fire truck for five different departments that need stuff right now. And that’s in addition to planning my evenings, weekends, and finances. It’s a lot, as I’m sure most of you know. Take this piece of advice: When the doctor tells you to bring down your hypertension and blood pressure, do it.

Then I found myself asking, “Why me?” Everybody told me that this is just something that happens in your head. It’s not punishment for anything, and the sooner you get treatment, the better you will be. My response has been that my left side is still there, and if it’s not damaged or missing, it will come back. Indeed, my mentor Catherine Roberts, told me that it took 11 weeks for her faculties to return after the stroke she had.

That’s not to say that other thoughts don’t creep in, even though I try my best to be positive. Now I can’t work, so what about my finances? How am I going to get around once I get home? I spent several weeks in the hospital, and three months in a rehab facility. It was definitely an education. The first cold hard reality was that there are people around me in far worse condition than myself. That made me feel better, with a sense of, “There but for the grace of God go I.” Seeing functioning people moving around me made me jealous until I figured out they were once in worse shape than me, and have gotten better, so now they are a model for my recovery.

One bright ray of light in this whole adventure has been the tremendous support of my girlfriend, Denise. She’s really sick herself with blood problems and so forth, but put her problems aside to care about me. Early on, I said, ”This is terrible!” She came back with a response I’ll always remember. She said, “Terrible is temporary.” That should be written on the walls in this place.

This is such a different lifestyle than before. Once I could go downstairs, take the trash out, do the laundry and a hundred other things with two hands. Now I have to know what to do with one hand. I can’t do my former job, and things like laundry and personal care will now be a challenge.

Living in a wheelchair every day makes you humble. It certainly makes you appreciate what you used to have. This is my first time going through this, so it’s a different world; however, less and less I’m thinking that this is some kind of a dream that I’ll wake up from.

Several lessons came from all this. If the doctor tells you to cut back and be more healthy, do it. Don’t wait for something to happen that will force you to follow this advice. I figured it would never happen to me, but it did.

Don’t take anything for granted. Things don’t have to work out well all the time. Something good may be around the corner. You are not immune to anything and do what it takes to avoid trouble. I didn’t, and it got me here.

I can’t be mad at what happened; it was my fault. What am I going to do? Sue the back of my brain? It’s like a hurricane – you can’t get back at nature.

This will be a cliffhanger, but it showed me the importance of life. You get one mind, one body, and one life. Use it well.

***

Chris Daigle is a Houston historian, photojournalist and a regular contributor to The Grapevine Source. To read more of his articles, click HERE.

Positive West Nile Virus Mosquito Sample in Grapevine

43088540_10161229397245268_8128279694203158528_nOne mosquito sample tested positive for carrying the West Nile Virus in the area of the 1500 block of North Dooley Street.

Mosquito control ground spraying will take place within a half-mile radius of the relevant area on Thursday, October 4 at 10pm. View a map of the area to be sprayed at bit.ly/2NlO3l2 or look at the map below.

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Baylor Scott & White Health, Memorial Hermann Health System Sign Letter of Intent to Create New Combined Health System

PRESS RELEASE

DALLAS and HOUSTON (Oct. 1, 2018) — The boards of Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann Health System have signed a letter of intent to merge into a combined system to further strengthen communities, advance the health of Texans and transform the delivery of healthcare.

As two of the most comprehensive not-for-profit health systems in Texas, Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann, both founded as faith-based organizations, share similar missions and values. Equally important, they share like-minded, forward-thinking visions for the future. This proposed combined health system is positioned to become a national model for integrated, consumer-centric, cost-effective care.

“This is about two mission-driven organizations – both committed to making safe, high-quality healthcare more convenient and affordable – building something transformative together,” said Jim Hinton, CEO, Baylor Scott & White Health. “We must lead the change in our industry, while insisting we continue to fulfill our unwavering commitments to meeting the needs of all Texans.”

The health systems, both nationally recognized and dedicated to improving access and continuity of care, serve as vibrant, economic engines in more than 30 Texas counties, employing more than 73,000 across the state. Both have strong ties to the academic medical community, and together will be positioned to expand those affiliations to advance medical training and research programs, while continuing to attract and retain the very best talent.

“Together, we believe we will be able to accelerate our commitments to make care more consumer centric; grow our capabilities to manage the health of populations; and bend the unsustainable healthcare cost curve in the state,” said Chuck Stokes, president and CEO, Memorial Hermann. “Through this combined system, we have a unique opportunity to reinvent healthcare and make a profound difference in the lives of millions of Texans.”  

The details of the letter of intent include:

  • Unified Board: A unified board will be comprised of an equal number of appointees from both organizations. Ross McKnight, the current chair of the Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees, will serve as the first chair of the proposed combined system’s board. A vice chair, selected by the Memorial Hermann Health System Board of Directors, will be named prior to closing and will become chair at the end of McKnight’s two-year term.
  • Leadership: Jim Hinton, CEO of Baylor Scott & White Health, will be the CEO of the proposed combined system and will be joined in the proposed Office of the CEO by Chuck Stokes, president and CEO of Memorial Hermann and Pete McCanna, president of Baylor Scott & White Health. Other members of the executive leadership team will be comprised of leaders from both Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann.
  • Operations: The proposed combined system will have executive and support staff based in Austin, Dallas, Houston and Temple.
  • Name: The proposed combined system will have a new name to be determined before closing; however, Baylor Scott & White Health and Memorial Hermann will continue to operate under their strong, highly regarded brands in their respective service areas. 

“Baylor Scott & White was founded as a Christian Ministry more than 100 years ago; ever since, it has advanced health and driven change in North and Central Texas,” said Ross McKnight, chair of the Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees. “This proposed combination starts the next chapter in the legacies of service and innovation for both systems. It will not only make a positive difference in the lives of millions here, it will become a national model.”

Together, the two systems include 68 hospital campuses, more than 1,100 care delivery sites, nearly 14,000 employed, independent and academic physicians and two health plans; and they currently record nearly 10 million patient encounters annually.

“Memorial Hermann has proudly served the Greater Houston area for more than 110 years with nationally recognized, high-quality patient care,” said Deborah Cannon, chair of the Memorial Hermann Health System Board of Directors. “Our mutual history of providing accessible and leading-edge healthcare for all people has laid a strong foundation for our shared vision to build a future together for the benefit of all Texans.

”With approval of the letter of intent, the two organizations have entered into a period of exclusive negotiations, due diligence and the standard regulatory review processes. The next stage in the transaction – a definitive agreement – is anticipated to be complete in 2019.

For more information, visit www.TransformingHealthTogether.com.