Category Archives: Dallas News

Dallas-made “Illegal” short film director Edgar Arreola elaborates on the project

Article 2 of 2 by Stacey Doud

***Spoiler Alert***

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The 24-minute short film, “Illegal,” which was written, directed, produced and brought to life by a cast and crew that reside in Dallas/Fort Worth, premiered on Facebook and YouTube on Friday June 12.

The story is about a fictional Hispanic man, Felix Martinez, who allegedly stole over $500 in gaming merchandise for his son’s birthday and was arrested because he took the goods out of the store because he was allegedly going to get a credit card from his wife, who was in a car in the parking lot. He did not speak English, nor did his wife.

The body of the film is set in the jury deliberation room, where six people had to decide Martinez’s crime and punishment, which could include deportation for him, but not necessarily for his children, who were both born in the United States.

edgararreola20203Director Edgar Arreola, whose acting credits include Guillermo in Sicario (2015) starring Benicio Del Toro, Emily Blunt and Josh Brolin; and proudly working beside Tom Hardy in his latest release, Capone (2020), directed by Josh Trank; as well as roles in 2 Guns (2013), featuring Golden Globe winner Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg, Paula Patton, and Edward James Olmos. Other projects include Machete (2010) and Machete Kills (2013) with Danny Trejo, Michelle Rodriguez, Sofía Vergara, and with Kevin Sorbo in Walking Tall: Lone Justice (2007).

Arreola, who has lived in the Dallas area for 30 years, shared his take on Dallas, as well as the film.

“Dallas is my home. I have made my acting career from Dallas. I’ve lived in Los Angeles, but then I came to Dallas because everyone was [very different] in LA. The funny thing is that my whole career I have made from Dallas. Aspiring actors think they need to go to LA to get work. That’s not true. My career has probably been slower to develop than some people in LA, but I’m not in a big rush,” Arreola said.

“After I read the script [for Illegal], as weird as this may sound, I was attracted to the ending. I like it because I want people to feel a bit frustrated, which could lead to conversations and discussions about these issues. The script itself was good, but what drove me to directing it was the ending.

“I am all for people having their own opinions and to build up their own ending. It’s a very personal choice because we can all have different points of view. I think every person, regardless of color and status, is always going to have a different perspective as to why this should/should not happen or why this did/did not happen. That was something that really impassioned me to direct the film because as I was reading it, I was already visualizing what I wanted to do.

“As far as me relating to the script [as a Mexican American], I probably had a connection to about 20-30%. I was making my mind up as I was reading. I was trying not to get personal with it, but to stay objective, so what happened in the film was for the sake of the film. I tried to detach myself from it in certain ways. I’m not going to say that some things didn’t made me mad or whatever, but you have to disconnect yourself and put your personal feelings to the side as a director, producer or an actor.

“The actors that we had were amazing and it was very easy for me to direct them because we were all professionals. They knew exactly what the perspective was from our end, as in from behind the camera’s point of view.

“The cinematography was amazing, too. I had a wonderful cinematographer. From the minute we started production, this guy was reading my mind. Sometimes we would have discrepancies, and I would say, ‘I want this done because this and that,’ and he would totally understand where I was coming from,” Arreola explained.

This short film was Arreola’s first directing job, though he has co-directed in the past. He also offers acting classes every Wednesday evening at his studio in Garland. For more information about classes, visit http://earrtistic.com/.

Local filmmakers make short film about racism and perception

Article 1 of 2 by Stacey Doud

***SPOILER ALERT***

IllegalLogoThe 24-minute short film, “Illegal,” which was written, directed, produced and brought to life by a cast and crew that reside in Dallas/Fort Worth, premiered on Facebook and YouTube on Friday June 12.

The story is about a fictional Hispanic man, Felix Martinez, who allegedly stole over $500 in gaming merchandise for his son’s birthday. He did not speak English, nor did his wife, who was out in the parking lot, allegedly holding the credit card to pay for the merchandise.

The body of the film is set in the jury deliberation room, where six people had to decide Martinez’s crime and punishment, which could include deportation for him, but not necessarily for his children, who were both born in the United States.

Producer Justin Kenyon shared some of his thoughts about the film.

Justin Kenyon“[The film’s reception is] so far, so good. Looking at the analytics, it looks like about 3,500 people have watched it so far. There’s a lot of conversations, especially about systematic racism and prejudice and stuff like that. That’s kind of why we decided to release it when we did. We wanted to inspire the people that are unsure about a lot of the stuff going on and give them a clearer understanding as to where a lot of these movements are coming from,” he said.

The idea was presented to Kenyon by Andy Trusevich, who would later become Executive Producer, in May of 2019, and Kenyon and his team started writing in late May or early June.

“We hired on a screenwriter because I’ve written plays, but I’ve never written a screenplay. It was a great process. We hired on Natasha Paris. I basically took the original idea and just ‘word vomited,’ and she wrote down everything I was saying, and we just kept workshopping it for a good two or three months because we filmed in August. We wrote it very fast,” Kenyon said.

“Andy Trusevich is an attorney, so he’s had a lot of insight in terms of legal issues, especially the systematic issues within the judicial department. So, when he came up with the idea and I heard about it, I thought, ‘Wow, this is incredibly relevant.’ I’m super passionate about the judicial system and the flaws within it,” said Kenyon.

“Felix Martinez [the man on trial in the film] was based on, “kind of like a group or an idea of a lot of people that face things like that. Especially, given that we live in Texas, not everybody speaks fluent English. While I was writing the film, I had an incident almost exactly like it, but being that I was an English-speaking white person, I didn’t have the trouble that [Felix Martinez] had,” Kenyon explained.

“I was at Lowe’s and I grabbed a grill, and I talked to the cashier because I needed to get more building supplies. So, I was just taking the grill outside to set it down for a second, so I could go grab the other stuff and bring it to the cashier because I didn’t want to block people’s way. Then [the employees] got onto me, saying, ‘You can’t leave with that grill!’ I was like, ‘Oh, my bad. I was just trying to keep it out of the way.’”

How differently would that have gone if a black or Hispanic person did this?

“That’s a lot of the points we make [in the film]. Say Felix wasn’t actually stealing; that he was actually just going to his car for his wallet. Had he been confronted, he could have said, ‘I’m just going out to the car for my wallet.’ But he couldn’t communicate [because he spoke Spanish].

“Morality is also a big question that everybody’s asking. I saw something recently about the looting and all that. I thought, ‘Stop condemning them for looting and ask them why they felt compelled to do all that.’

“I think [rapper] Killer Mike said it well. I can’t remember the exact words, but it’s basically making a point: They’ve been taken from for so long that they’re [#BLM] basically showing [non-blacks] first-hand, ‘This is what it feels like to have things taken from us.’ It’s like large corporations. Turning it into a metaphor, I think it is very symbolic and it works because [the big box store] Target, in their next stage [after the riots], are saying, ‘We’ll stand with you, yada yada.’ So, it works.,” said Kenyon.

He also believes that the COVID pandemic contributed to this climate of unrest.

“I think the reason, other than it just being ‘enough is enough,’ people are glued to their phones. They’re not busy working. They’re not doing other things because a lot of people were unemployed during all of this. So, everybody’s paying attention,” he said. “I think we need to pay attention because too often, we have been busy and had other things going on in our lives, and so we can’t address these issues because we have more pressing issues going on. But now, this [COVID/Floyd] IS the pressing issue,” Kenyon concluded.

“I think the film was relevant a year ago but is especially relevant now. The big point and the reason that we released it at this time is that we [producers], being myself and Lauren Lamb, were skeptical about the film because we are both white. It almost didn’t seem like our place [to release it], but given the current movement and everything else, and [minorities] saying, ‘It’s time for white people to step up not necessarily to ‘take the mic,’ but and stand with us and fight back against a lot of these systematic issues because they were all created by white people, so it’s up to white people to help fix it.

“All the protests that I’ve gone to have been Hispanic, white and black, and everyone is standing in solidarity in the Black Lives Matter movement, and I think that is amazing. A majority of Americans aren’t [overtly] racist people, but one apple spoils the bunch, so we have to take care of all of the [rotten] apples,” Kenyon said.

“Everybody has some sort of imbedded amount of racism, and we talk about this unconscious bias. I went to school in a very white and Asian town, and I had so many unconscious biases, so when I got out in the world I thought, ‘I was so wrong and acted like a jerk.’

“In school, saying the ‘N’ word was okay, but when we left, I realized how much it wasn’t okay. I discovered that I had actually been part of the problem. When you are in your little ‘bubble,’ you don’t know. It’s our job every day to learn something new and go out of our way. My co-producer Lauren Lamb is really big on that. She’s been doing a lot of activism in terms of this. We need to grow and try to get better and unlearn our ideals and biases and educating ourselves,” Kenyon explained.

As for the film itself, the writers shied away from blatantly categorizing characters with political leanings.

“We tried to make the story and characters split down the middle as far as politics go. But we never actually said, ‘so and so is a Republican’ or whatever,” Kenyon explained. “We are leaving that for the audience to come to a conclusion based on how the characters speak and act. We are trying to unite all people and point out that we are all the same species, we are all human and we are all Americans. It’s kind of a metaphor for putting yourself in other people’s shoes.

“As for the ending, we wanted to leave the verdict up to the audience as well and let them decide. Once you see all the facts, you choose what’s right and wrong. You have your moral compass. It’s kind of a metaphor for America. Everybody has the things they want to believe, but at the end of the day, you are making your own decisions, and I wanted to help inspire people, no matter what they believe or what they were told to believe, that they have every right to do what is right in their minds.”

One of the main questions that the film brings up is can compassion ever really intersect with the law?

“[Juror] Anton makes really great points: the laws are not always right. Segregation was legal over 50 years ago. Slavery was legal a couple of hundreds of years ago. Laws don’t depict what is right and wrong because not all laws encompass the whole of society but tend to put certain people ‘ahead’ of other people,” Kenyon said.

“I guess the message is that nothing is black and white. Everything is a gray area. Everything is interpreted differently by different people, and every situation is unique. I think the issues with some of our laws is that they are very black and white. You’re either guilty or you’re not.”

No matter what the viewer’s verdict is, one must consider if the punishment fits the crime, which is a common question in the penal system today.

Part 2 coming soon!

Editor’s Corner -Dallas riots: How does violence bring about peace?

Closed copyI went to downtown Dallas yesterday to take pics of the carnage after the non-peaceful protests the weekend before.

For those of you who are not aware, an unarmed black man, George Floyd, died when FOUR police officers held him down while he was handcuffed in Minneapolis, MN. One of the officers put his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck, which may have led to his demise. All four officers have been fired (even the three that were non-white) and a Grand Jury will determine their fate. I know they’ll never work in law enforcement again, at the very least.

When I first saw the video, I thought that (ex-) Officer Chauvin, the cop with the knee on the neck (the practice of which has been obliterated from most police agencies across the country, but sadly and obviously, is still used at times), was an obvious murderer. Mr. Floyd can be heard saying, “I can’t breathe!” Yet Chauvin did not get up, nor did his fellow officers try to stop him.

Bland copyFloyd was under arrest for trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. He did resist getting into the police vehicle, falling down on purpose. But as far as I know, there was no prior resistance to the arrest except for Floyd quoting the NWA song, “F*** the Police.” I don’t know why it took four officers to subdue a mostly peaceful criminal. But then again, I could only see a few minutes of this event that unfolded in much more than 10 minutes.

Two autopsies were done, and both found that the manner of death was homicide. But the two reports were a bit different. The autopsy report from the Hennepin County Medical Examiner claimed that Floyd died from a heart attack, noting that Floyd had arteriosclerotic and hypertensive heart disease, was high on the drug fentanyl and had recently used methamphetamine.

The Floyd family had their own independent autopsy done which concluded that Floyd had died of “mechanical asphyxia,” which is basically the restriction of blood and oxygen to the brain, and is consistent with the knee on neck position.

Crowdus copySo why was I sent to downtown Dallas? This happened in Minnesota.

It is my belief that people were already on edge due to COVID, and when this happened, the anger broke loose all over the country. What I do not understand is why people think that violence is the proper response to violence. Dallas is thousands of miles away from Minneapolis. I do understand that colored people are sick and tired of police brutality directed at their race. As a white person, I can only understand on the fringe, though being a volunteer with the NAACP has taught me a lot. And it’s not like ONLY black people were protesting.

It was sad to walk down Main Street in Dallas and see the needless destruction. Very few pedestrians were walking about, but vehicular traffic seemed to be normal. So many businesses were boarded up and closed. It is my understanding that, despite the 7pm curfew, that downtown was preparing for more riots. A few protests were held just outside of the curfew zone in Dallas last night, but the biggest news was a protest in Arlington.

What is this world we live in? When will the Coronavirus cease to be a threat? When will people stop being on edge? When will violence about something that happened thousands of miles away stop?

I wish I could tell you. But in the meantime, stay safe and please express your opinions peacefully. Even George Floyd’s brother asked for peace. If he can rise above what happened, then we all can.

Here’s Where You Can Get A COVID-19 Test For Free In DFW

BY WILL MADDOX 

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A COVID-19 mobile testing facility in New York, not unlike what you’ll find at Ellis Davis Field House and the American Airlines Center. ((U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Amouris Coss // Flickr Creative Commons)

MD Medical Group will be offering free drive-thru COVID-19 testing at nine of its DFW clinics. The tests will still require patients to be screened for flu and strep throat prior to COVID-19 testing, and appointments are required.

The state of Texas has some of the worst testing rates, and researchers predict that many of the hardest hit areas will be low-income neighborhoods in Dallas, which is also lacking data about who has been tested so far. Making testing geographically and financially accessible is important if the virus is going to be contained.

Read more from D Magazine…

DEA announces launch of Operation Crystal Shield

PRESS RELEASE

image001DALLAS – Drug Enforcement Administration Acting Administrator Uttam Dhillon today announced that the DEA will direct enforcement resources to methamphetamine “transportation hubs” — areas where methamphetamine is often trafficked in bulk and then distributed across the country. While continuing to focus on stopping drugs being smuggled across the border, DEA’s Operation Crystal Shield will ramp up enforcement to block their further distribution into America’s neighborhoods.

DEA has identified eight major methamphetamine transportation hubs where these efforts will be concentrated: Atlanta, Dallas, El Paso, Houston, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Phoenix, and St. Louis. Together, these DEA Field Divisions accounted for more than 75 percent of methamphetamine seized in the U.S. in 2019.

Operation Crystal Shield builds on existing DEA initiatives that target major drug trafficking networks, including the Mexican cartels that are responsible for the overwhelming majority of methamphetamine trafficked into and within the United States. From FY 2017 to FY 2019, DEA domestic seizures of methamphetamine increased 127 percent from 49,507 pounds to 112,146 pounds. During the same time frame, the number of DEA arrests related to methamphetamine rose nearly twenty percent. 

“For decades, methamphetamine has been a leading cause of violence and addiction – a drug threat that has never gone away,” said Acting Administrator Dhillon. “With a 22 percent increase in methamphetamine-related overdose deaths, now is the time to act, and DEA is leading the way with a surge of interdiction efforts and resources, targeting regional transportation hubs throughout the United States. By reducing the supply of meth, we reduce the violence, addiction, and death it spreads.”

“Seizures of methamphetamine in the Dallas Field Division, which includes North Texas and Oklahoma, have increased over 430% from 2018 to 2019. This staggering number reflects both the threat we face and the resolve of the DEA to keep methamphetamine out of our neighborhoods.  With our nationwide, concerted effort through Operation Crystal Shield, we will be partnering with other DEA offices across the globe to identify those transportation networks and command structures to ensure their greed is met with swift justice,” said DEA Dallas Field Division Special Agent in Charge Eduardo A. Chávez.

Virtually all methamphetamine in the United States comes through major ports of entry along the Southwest Border and is transported by tractor trailers and personal vehicles along the nation’s highways to major transfer centers around the country. It is often found in poly-drug loads, alongside cocaine, heroin, and fentanyl.

For more information, visit DEA.gov.

Dallas’ Lakewood Theater finds second life with hip new bowling alley

By Teresa Gubbins

The iconic Lakewood Theater will soon be home to a new bowling alley, when a Colorado-based concept called Bowlski’s opens in the long-vacant venue. According to their website, they’ll open in summer 2019.

Bowlski’s is a family-run bowling business started in Colorado by Craig and Jennifer Spivey, who have more than 10 years’ experience in the restaurant industry and five-plus years operating as bowling proprietor.

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Bowlounge and Bowlero are bowling cousins. (Courtesy photo)

Read more from the CultureMap Dallas…

Is Italian grocery and eatery Eataly cooking up a Dallas entry?

Maria Halkias, Retail Writer

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Eataly’s Las Vegas location is the most recent to open in the U.S. It’s located at the entrance of the Park MGM Hotel. (Steve Brown /Dallas Morning News )

Eataly, a hybrid grocery and restaurant concept created in Italy in 2007 and now in 37 locations around the world, appears to have taken a formal step into Texas.

Eataly Dallas LLC was created in Delaware last month, a move first reported by D Magazine. Eataly has only six stores in the U.S. in New York, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and most recently Las Vegas.

Read more from The Dallas News…

Regal Row Street Racers Captured on Camera in Dallas

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At least once a week, part of a major Dallas roadway has been closing down for street racers. Hundreds of people, breaking the law for the thrill of it. Thursday night, it was all caught on camera and now Dallas Police say they’re working in overdrive to stop them. (Photo: NBCDFW)

Squealing tires, revved up engines — the sounds of street racing on Regal Row have been driving some crazy for years.

“They still doing they thing though. I don’t think it’s gonna stop,” said Ricky Ballard, an employee at nearby Allied Interiors.

New video, captured overnight, shows the cars and trucks in action near Irving Boulevard. Employees at Allied Interiors often get a front row seat.

“They take off right here and they go to the bridge. Once they get to the bridge, the first one to the bridge is the winner,” Ballard said.

Read more from NBCDFW…

Parking space squabble on Dallas’ McKinney Avenue ends in shooting

By Teresa Gubbins

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2600 block of McKinney Avenue. (Google)

A fight over payment for a parking space ended up in a shooting on a main thoroughfare in Uptown Dallas.

According to the Dallas Police Department, the incident took place on April 22 at around 12:34 a.m., when officers responded to a call about a shooting in the 2600 block of McKinney Avenue.

Police interviewed the victim, who stated he was involved in a physical altercation with the suspect, identified in a release as 28-year-old Nnaemeka Onyedebely, regarding payment of a parking space.

Read more from CultureMap Dallas…

Police file charge against Dallas woman beaten by Deep Ellum bartender

By Teresa Gubbins

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L’Daijohnique Lee (YouTube)

A woman who was the victim of an assault in Deep Ellum now has charges filed against her for causing damage to her attacker’s pickup truck.

L’Daijohnique Lee, 24, has been charged with felony criminal mischief, according to a Dallas Police Department press conference on April 2.

Lee was beaten on March 21 by Austin Shuffield, a bartender at a Deep Ellum club, after a confrontation in a parking lot which was captured on video by a witness.

Read more from CultureMap Dallas…