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Grapevine Rotary Rubber Duck Race scheduled for Sept. 10

Screen Shot 2020-08-02 at 8.35.58 AMJoin us this September 10th as the Grapevine Rotary Club hosts the 3rd Annual Rubber Duck Race in the Lazy River at The REC of Grapevine.

Thousands of free-spirited yellow rubber ducks will be dropped into The REC Lazy River where they will race to see who is the fastest.

The event will take place from 5-7pm at The REC of Grapevine in fair or Fowl weather!

The winning Duck will earn $1,000, second place wins $500 and third place wins $250.

100% of all proceeds support the Grapevine Rotary Club community programs, such as scholarships for high school seniors, Computers for Kids, Special Olympics, RYLA, Feed Our Kid and American Flags on Main Street.

Every year, Grapevine Rotary Club awards as many scholarships as possible to qualified graduating senior applicants. The impact of these awards for the students in our areas is amazing. In April, we awarded 16 of these scholarships in the amount of $1500 each from the proceeds of our 2019 Duck Race.  

ChuckAll of the ducks are churning up the water to get back in their best racing form after eating too much during quarantine (except for Chuck, who is lounging around the pool. He’s “supervising”).

For more information or to adopt a duck, visit https://grapevinerotaryduckrace.com/ or email grapevinerubberduckrace@gmail.com.

Here’s hoping your duck wins!

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Download the flyer HERE (.pdf)

The Man Who Ate Cheeseburgers…I Mean Dog Food… for a Month

By Stacey Doud

30 Days GraphicMitch Felderhoff, who is a fourth generation owner of Muenster Milling Company in Muenster, Texas, is known for his lightheartedness, practical jokes and making quality food for pooches. He is also known locally and nationally for eating nothing but his company’s dog food for 30 days to illustrate the quality of Muenster Milling Co. food. He was monitored by his family physician to make sure that he was staying healthy.

Muenster Milling Co.has been in existence since 1932, when Mitch’s great-grandfather, Joe Felderhoff, established a flour mill. The business was passed down to Mitch’s grandfather, Arthur, who, after he served his country in WWII, converted the site into a livestock feed mill.

The company also had a brief stint as a dairy feed plant because of a newly built cheese plant in Muenster that operated for close to 40 years. I wonder what kind of cheese they made? Hmmmm.

“We provided most of the dairy feed to all the dairies in the area that brought their milk into the cheese plant. Now, there’s a huge cheese plant in Amarillo as well as one in California, and the people who had owned the cheese plant here were part of the Co-Op, and so they shut this one down,” Mitch explained.

Mitch’s dad, Ronnie Felderhoff, decided to take the company in a new direction when it was his time to run the Mill, and, in 1989, Muenster Milling Co. started to produce pet food.They currently offer dog, chicken and horse feed.

Dog Obesity Slide

Mitch officially joined the company In 2007 to head the sales and marketing department, and his brother, Chad, joined in the summer of 2013, though both men had basically grown up helping out in the Mill. Now, the brothers are co-owners and work together to keep Muenster’s products meeting excellent standards, which Mitch, personally and gustatorily, found out.

So, what’s up with the month of dog food?

Mitch“We are a small company, and it’s hard to have a voice and to get the right message and information out there, and so we had to come up with an idea that other people would not be willing to do. The CEOs of Nestlé, Purina and Mars are not going to eat dog food for a month,” Mitch said.

“I came up with the idea while I was on vacation. I had been trying to think for several years about what we can do to get our message out there – to provide healthier diets to more dogs. I was on a trip with my wife and was staring at the ocean, and the thought popped into my head: ‘I bet no one has eaten dog food for a month.’”

When he started his quest, Mitch weighed around 230 pounds at 6’3”. He lost 30 of those pounds, according to the physician, but that’s not all.

His cholesterol went down 64 points, his triglycerides went down 209 points and his liver enzyme panel went down 34 points.

So, does Mitch recommend eating dog food for a while?

“No, don’t do it,” he said. “But it sure made me more aware of what I do eat and assured me that we are still making products that will keep dogs healthy and happy.”

Muenster Milling Co. dog food is available for purchase online with home delivery at https://muenstermilling.com/ or you can search for your closest retailer at https://muenstermilling.com/where-to-buy/They are looking to expand to cat foods very soon.

To watch Mitch’s 30 Days of Dog Food, complete with practical jokes and very honest critiques of his meals, watch the documentary at https://youtu.be/3Q_FPPslCWs

Grapevine Police have taken a juvenile into custody following a pursuit that ended in Southlake

gpdAt 7:04 a.m., today, officers were dispatched to a major accident at the SH-114/SH-121 split near Main Street. The juvenile driver of a stolen vehicle struck the barrier dividing the two highways. A Good Samaritan stopped to help and called 911. The driver of the stolen car then stole the Good Samaritan’s truck and drove away. A witness followed the suspect until police located the suspect, and a pursuit began.

The suspect drove into a cul-de-sac on Chaparral Court in Grapevine. A Grapevine officer got out of his patrol vehicle to approach the suspect, and the suspect drove towards the officer. The officer fired four rounds towards the moving truck because he thought he was going to get hit by the truck. Two bullets hit the suspect’s vehicle, none struck the suspect.

The suspect continued to flee, crashing into another vehicle near Moss Lane and East Dove in Southlake. The suspect then jumped out and started running south through a Southlake neighborhood. Witnesses saw him go into a backyard.

Police set up a perimeter and conducted a search, while DPS Air-One helped search for the suspect from the sky.

Officers located the suspect at 8:22 a.m. and took him into custody. He was transported to Baylor Scott and White Medical Center-Grapevine for treatment of a police K-9 bite. The juvenile has been identified as a 15-year-old male. The investigation is ongoing and multiple charges are expected.

The officer who fired his weapon is uninjured, and is now on paid administrative leave, pending the outcome of a full investigation.

Grapevine Police thank Grapevine Fire, DPS Air One, and Southlake Police and Fire for their assistance in this case.

GRAPEVINE’S 34th ANNUAL GRAPEFEST® FESTIVAL CANCELED

107998385_10157129025206968_5506700586486693291_oGRAPEVINE, TEXAS – (July 13, 2020) – In support of State of Texas and the City of Grapevine’s guidelines and procedures to stem the spread of COVID-19, the 34th Annual GrapeFest – A Texas Wine Experience has been canceled. “We made the difficult decision to cancel the festival,” said Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau Executive Director, Paul W. McCallum. “Citing concerns for the safety of attendees, volunteers, staff, sponsors and vendors.”

The greatly anticipated annual festival is the largest wine festival in the Southwest and was to be held on Grapevine’s Historic Main Street District September 17, 18, 19 and 20, 2020. This annual four day festival attracts more than 260,000 visitors.

“GrapeFest is one of Grapevine’s marquee festivals that we take great pride in showcasing not only for the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, but to visitors from around the world,” said Steve and Maggie Haley, 34th Annual GrapeFest Co-Chairpersons. They further added “We want to thank our volunteers, 38 civic and service charitable organizations, sponsors and vendors. We now must look forward to GrapeFest 2021.”

This year would have marked the 34th Annual GrapeFest-A Texas Wine Experience, presented by Bank of the West. Each year the city bands together to plan four days of family-friendly festival fun where residents and visitors sip and sample premium Texas wines and champagne while enjoying live entertainment, festival food and so much more. Throughout the event, guests would participate in the People’s Choice Wine Tasting Classic the largest, consumer-judged wine competition in the United States that showcased 45 Texas wineries pouring 162 wines. In addition, 240 wines are featured from around the country and world.

For more information on Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau and for business and event updates relating to COVID-19, please visit grapevinetexasusa.com or call the Convention and visitors Bureau at  (800) 457-6338.

Dallas Area Attorney Takes the Stigma Out of Bankruptcy

By Stacey Doud, M.A.

With so many individuals, families and businesses feeling the crunch of the COVID pandemic, many are looking at bankruptcy as an option just to stay afloat in this economy. “Bankruptcy” has become a word that can cause shame and embarrassment in today’s society, but it can actually be a palpable, and even a favorable, option.

quote-thumbDallas resident and attorney Reed Allmand is Board-Certified in Consumer Bankruptcy and has been in this field for the last 20 years. This unique time in history has society confused, unemployed and, most likely, broke. Filing for bankruptcy is just one of several ways of dealing with overwhelming debt.

“We see people all over the Metroplex. We mainly work with individuals who are going to be filing for bankruptcy, but we also help small businesses as well,” Allmand said.

“For Chapter 11s, we are able to recognize when bankruptcy is appropriate and I have referral networks where I send those 11s because they’re a different animal, as far as a business model to service them. One big Chapter 11 can keep a law firm busy for months, said Allmand.

“About a year ago, we developed a portal on our website, so since [COVID] happened in March, we were able to have people just go to our website and log on through that portal, where we can videoconference with them, exchange documents securely and file bankruptcy schedules using electronic signatures. So, we’ve been able to file cases for people without them ever leaving their homes.

“Some other jurisdictions across the U.S. had the judges to sign this order, so I wrote a letter to our judges and said, ‘I met this lady with COVID who can’t leave her house. Her car is about to be repossessed, so we need her to ‘DocuSign’ her petition so we can get this going. A couple of days later, several other jurisdictions jumped on board, and so we were able to take care of this matter with no outside risk to the client,” Allmand explained.

According to Allmand, bankruptcy filings are slightly down overall, but bankruptcy consultations and bankruptcy questions are going up. “Sometimes, when you’re in the middle of an emergency, a lot of times people will do the bankruptcy to kind of clean up the aftermath. If they lost their job and they are on unemployment, those extra benefits kind of helped people to stay afloat. But all of that is coming to an end in July.

“July is going to be the perfect storm because you have the CARES Act Eviction Moratorium expiring on July 25 so they can give the 30-day notice. At the end of the month is when the extra $600 per month ends. Even the Dallas Moratorium has expired. You’d usually see 700 to 1,000 people in Dallas County up for eviction per week, but it’s been hardly anything these last couple of months. There’s a groundswell building up and when it’s released, it’s going to be big.

“Many people are already taking advantage of the Mortgage Forbearance Program. And then you have the CARES Act, which I think that around 75% of mortgages fall under. These programs are supposed to get with the borrower so they can set up a payment plan, which may or may not happen.

“From my experience, it just seems like people are shocked and ashamed. They don’t want to even talk about bankruptcy, so they do everything in their power to avoid it. They liquidate their retirement accounts. This is sad, because you have those funds there for your retirement, but if you had talked to me, I could file the bankruptcy case and the retirement accounts won’t be lost.

“The equity in your house is protected, so you go get a home equity loan and pay off credit cards. When they can’t pay back the loan, the bank takes their house. That’s what I am trying to get across to people,” Allmand warned.

“Most people call me when the repo man is looking for the car and it’s in foreclosure or they’re getting sued and somebody is garnishing their wages. However, in Texas, judgement creditors can’t garnish your wages. Only the IRS or the Attorney General can do that. But if we file a bankruptcy case, all of those entities have to stop all garnishment of wages. These actions acknowledge an individual’s power, and people need to get to get the information they need so they can make informed decisions.

“I’ve dealt with people in all kinds of situations. I’ve had a suicidal person come in. This gentleman was up for foreclosure and had gotten my letter in the mail. He came in and he was really quiet. I talked to him, going over what his options were and then put a plan together for him. He started crying and said, ‘I’m so glad I called you. I was sitting in my car thinking that I’m just going to kill myself.’

“What kind of pressure is that? It really brought home just how on the edge people are getting. Medical expenses are the number one reason for filing, along with job loss and divorce. And, while some folks don‘t have cable or WIFI, they usually have a phone. But that may go on and off, depending on where they are with their bill. I had a client named Michele a few years back. Her husband had just lost his job, along with their medical insurance. Her son had diabetes. His insulin alone cost over $2,000 per month. So yes, these folks are hitting hard times. It can happen to anyone.

“We know that basically, people want to pay these debts. They don’t like owing money. More people file bankruptcy in the wake of divorce or cancer or whatever, and it’s a call already included in risk-assessment. When it is the best choice, there’s no need to put off filing bankruptcy because there’s really no shame in it. It’s not like people are going to be put in debtor’s prison forever. It’s actually getting people back into society with a fresh start quicker.

“It’s true that filing bankruptcy will affect your credit score, but the score is based on other factors that, after filing, the score easily goes up. We subscribe to a service called Credit Experts, and we pull from them the current score, and it gives us the predicted score after one year, which is usually one year after filing, and we’ve found that if the client does all the things they need to do, the credit score is between 50-100 points higher than it was when they first filed. Bankruptcy does not ‘erase’ your credit report, but it takes all of the derogatories and negative things and replaces them with ‘Discharged in Bankruptcy on X day.’

“Typically, the way you get that score to skyrocket after bankruptcy is to get a secured [credit] card, maybe reaffirm on your vehicle and keep making the payments and your mortgage and things. It’s kind of like when you first started with no credit history.

“A lot of our clients file for bankruptcy [Chapter 7], and then turn around the next day and qualify to purchase a car. This is because they are often able to get a better car deal after they’ve turned in the old one and wiped out all of the debt because the car lender knows that [the individual] can’t file another Chapter 7 for another eight years and all their other debt is wiped out, and that car will never be discharged and that loan will never be discharged because they’re going to make you pay it off in five [years].

“When a client comes to the office, they are immediately put into our educational program called, ‘Seven Steps to 720 [credit score],’ which is a credit education course. In this, we are looking at any loans that are going to carry through the bankruptcy, and we give them our advice about whether or not to keep those loans. Then, they are set up on a budget to know how they are going to go forward. Most of the time, they’ve gotten familiar with living on a cash basis.

“Most people just want to know how much the payment is going to be per month. They’re not thinking about the interest they have to pay or if the car breaks down and things like that. Even if they’re being responsible, people just live up to their income. They’re not going over, and whatever debt they get, they can afford to pay. But if they lose a job, if COVID happens, if they get laid off, they have zero safety net.

“It’s very humbling when you do this job to see that it can happen to anybody. I put savings aside, but if lost my source of income for a year, I’m going to be in trouble, too.

“There’s a perception in society that the people who are in these situations brought it on themselves. I may tell someone what I do, and they say things like, ‘I hope I never have to come see you,’ and ‘How can they afford you if they’re so broke? They must be going on trips and using up their credit cards.’ But there are so many reasons not to be so judgmental. You see the pain in someone’s eyes and all the things that they have tried to avoid [bankruptcy], often putting it off way too long.

“A pro bono client, who was legally blind, was in my office filing for bankruptcy a few months back. She had three car repossessions. I asked her about that, and she said that her abusive ex-husband shot her point-blank in the head, which made her go blind. Then he signed for all of the cars in her name. Then they got repossessed. That’s an extreme case, but it goes to show you that you can’t judge a book by its cover.

“The hardest cases for me to take on are the elderly people that have a child or other family member/caregiver taking advantage of them. These people sometimes work two or three jobs just to make ends meet while the child or ‘caregiver’ is off spending all of the money.

“I do a lot of pro bono cases through the Dallas Volunteer Attorney Program (DVAP). I grew up in Abilene and went to Abilene Christian University, and I feel really blessed with what I do for a living. It feels like it’s my mission in life,” Allmand concluded.

If you or someone you know could benefit from Allmand’s advice and programs, call for a FREE consultation at (214) 884-4020 or visit AllmandLaw.com.

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Grant Imahara, host of MythBusters, dies at 49

940x0Grant Imahara, an electrical engineer who co-hosted “MythBusters” as well as the Netflix show “White Rabbit Project,” has died, a spokesperson for Discovery confirmed. He was 49 years old.

“We are heartbroken to hear this sad news about Grant. He was an important part of our Discovery family and a really wonderful man. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family,” Discovery said in a statement to Variety.

A company spokesperson told the New York Times the cause of death is believed to be a brain aneurysm.

Read more from The San Francisco Chronicle…

GPISD Board of Trustees Votes to Rename Elementary School

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Grand Prairie, Texas – On the heels of unanimously adopting a Racial Equity Resolution, the GPISD Board of Trustees voted last night to rename the current Robert E. Lee Elementary School after longtime GPISD educator and principal Delmas Morton.

The school’s new namesake, Mr. Delmas Morton, was raised in Grand Prairie and attended Dalworth Elementary School, now known as David Daniels Elementary Academy of Science and Math.

Because he was not allowed to attend Grand Prairie High School and there were no high schools available for students of color in Grand Prairie, Morton attended Booker T. Washington High School in Dallas.

He went on to attend Texas College on a band scholarship, and graduated with his bachelor’s degree in 1952. He later earned his master’s degree from Prairie View A&M University.

Mr. Morton is an Army veteran and fought in the Korean War. After the war, he returned to Grand Prairie to begin teaching at Dalworth. In the mid-70s, he transferred to Adams Middle School. He later moved to Austin Elementary School, where he served as principal for 17 years. In total, Mr. Morton has served the schoolchildren of Grand Prairie ISD for more than 40 years.

“I want to thank my fellow trustees for their care and attention to this important issue,” said Board President Aaron King. “I’m proud that we have the opportunity to honor Mr. Morton and his legacy as a great man and a great educator.”

The school, originally built in 1942, was renamed Robert E. Lee Junior High in June 1955 when the District opened its second junior high school named after Thomas Jefferson. The school was converted to an elementary campus in 2010.

A Message from Grapevine Mayor William D. Tate

Dear Friends,

108950414_10164233766805268_8008274536047627185_nThese times are trying the souls of all humankind. We are dealing with an unknown enemy that is threatening our health, our economy, and our way of life. Our knowledge of ways to defeat this virus is limited. Short of a cure or a vaccine, which now is beyond our reach, we must come together. Many projections have been incorrect and the data has been inconsistent. People are not sure what to do and do not know what to believe. However, it is clear that we are all in this together and we need every citizen to join our army to defeat it. The medical community nor public officials cannot defeat it alone. You are the best weapon that we now have.

Efforts across Texas must be unified, so we depend on County and State orders to ensure all Texans are working together in combatting this disease. We have been ordered by the Governor and the Tarrant County Judge to practice social distancing, to wear a mask when out in public, to use good hygiene, and stay at home as much as possible. I realize people are tired of staying home and many do not want to wear a mask, especially in this Texas summer heat.

I have heard the arguments made by those against wearing a mask and I believe they all pale compared to the devastating consequences we will all suffer if we do not comply. Additionally, I have seen much of the scientific evidence, which has convinced me that masks do effectively reduce the community spread of COVID-19. The requirement to wear a mask is only temporary, so to comply does not give up any civil rights in my opinion.

It remains unknown which of us will get the disease and which of us will die from it. Therefore, we need to protect ourselves and those we love. If you feel invincible to the virus and feel you do not need to wear a mask, then I ask you to do so for the following reasons:

  • Do it for the elderly and those who have underlying health conditions whose lives are most at risk.
  • Do it for the medical personnel that have treated the sick until they are exhausted.
  • Do it for the teachers who soon will be at risk and have to work twice as hard to teach in the classroom and online.
  • Do it for the schoolchildren so they will have a chance to get back in the classroom this fall.
  • Do it for those who have lost their jobs and are unemployed, to give them a chance to get back to work and support their families.
  • Do it for the millions of Americans in danger of their homes being foreclosed on in the next few months.
  • Do it so you can look back when this period is behind us and feel proud that you did your part in defeating COVID-19.
  • Do it to set a good example.

If for no other reason, do it because it is the polite thing to do.

Not wearing a face-covering could result in civil penalties. However, even more harmful would be for our economy to be shut down again. We cannot afford this alternative, so I ask that everyone voluntarily comply.

I appreciate the majority of our citizens who have already joined the fight and are doing everything they can to conquer this virus. Please encourage others to do the same.

Be blessed and stay encouraged, Grapevine.

Mayor William D. Tate

GPD Warns Against Leaving Vehicles Unlocked

1D6lwT_S_00C7RLyQ00The Grapevine Police Department is still taking burglary reports involving UNLOCKED cars. Many are happening in apartment complexes and parking lots. Items taken included wallets, credit cards, and in one case a firearm.

These types of burglaries often lead to credit/debit card abuse and identity theft. The best thing you can do to protect yourself is to limit a criminal’s ability and opportunity to commit crime.

While it only takes a few seconds to secure your valuables and lock the doors, it also only takes a few seconds for thieves to check the handle and steal from unlocked cars.

Remember, the appearance of something valuable is enough to lure a thief. You may know your backpack is empty, but a thief could think it’s holding a laptop. One reason SUVs and pickups are common targets is because they don’t have a trunk to hold valuables. Owners generally just hide their valuables out of sight. Thieves know this, and can check glove compartments, behind seats, and under seats in mere seconds.

38th Annual July 4th Fireworks Extravaganza

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NOTE: If attending the 38th Annual July 4th Fireworks Extravaganza in person, face masks are required and must be worn at all times. Parking permitted in designated lots only.

On Saturday, July 4, celebrate the red, white and blue at Grapevine’s 38th Annual July 4th Fireworks Extravaganza. This is Grapevine’s biggest fireworks display to date, shooting the largest shells ever fired. This free 24-minute fireworks spectacular over Lake Grapevine begins at 9:30 p.m. and is set to patriotic music, The fireworks display is the perfect way to celebrate America’s birthday and this will be Grapevine’s biggest display to date!

Go to special soundtrack to accompany the show!

For more information about Grapevine’s Fourth of July activities, call 817-410-3185.

Lake Parks Viewing Areas

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  • Oak Grove Park
    o    Oak Grove Baseball Field ($10 per car entry fee)
    o    Minnow Loop (Drop-off Only) 
    o    Trawick Pavilion ($10 per car entry fee)
    o    Oak Grove Soccer Complex ($10 per car entry fee)
    o    McPherson Slough (No fee)
    o    Oak Grove Softball Complex (Boat traffic only)
  • Rockledge Park ($20 per car entry fee, card only, no cash)
  • Scott’s Landing Marina  (Private parking & cash only)
  • Silver Lake Park by Silver Lake Marina (Private parking & cash only)

Due to capacity limitations, cars will not be allowed to leave and re-enter the park without paying an additional fee.

Viewing Areas/Parking

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VIEWING AREAS WITH RESTRICTED ACCESS:

  • The Vineyards Campground & Cabins (Accessible to guests only with pre-scheduled reservations for that Friday night. Gates are closed to general public. Click here to make your reservation)

LAKE PARKS WITH LIMITED VIEWING:

  • Lakeview Park ($10 per car entry fee, card only, no cash)
  • Meadowmere Park ($10 per car entry fee, card only, no cash)

OTHER LOCATIONS:

  • Hotel Vin / Grapevine Main Parking Garage – 255 E. Dallas Rd. (No fee)

Read more HERE.