The City of Fort Worth will host the Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System (CCDS)

Screen Shot 2020-04-29 at 11.29.18 AMThe City of Fort Worth in conjunction with Battelle Memorial Institute, Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council (NCTTRAC) will begin accepting N95 filtration masks that have been used by First Responders or Health Care Professionals. Each mask will be inspected and complete a through decontamination process up to twenty times enhancing the life expectancy of this protective equipment important in the fight against Covid-19.

In order to allow current personal protective equipment (PPE) inventories to continue to stay above minimum numbers the FDA has approved Battelle to decontaminate N95 masks that are routinely considerable disposable. The site in Fort Worth will eventually be able to process up to 80,000 masks every 24 hours. The Battelle/Fort Worth site will serve as a regional hub and serve Texans from the Panhandle to the Piney Woods.

Health Care Organizations and First Responder Agencies will need to register with Battelle to receive information. “We are pleased to partner with a highly recognized organization such as Battelle to help coordinate this process of prolonging our PPE” said Ft. Worth Fire Chief James Davis. “It will allow Fort Worth to help our regional healthcare partners while continuing to provide care and maintain our inventory of N95 masks”.

For further information about Battelle and their process please visit their website at https://www.battelle.org.

How Many Flat Tires Are Worth an Officer’s Life?

By Chief Scott Hughes, CoP in Hamilton Township, OH

spike-strip-1Since the development of the tire deployment device (TDD), not a year has passed without the loss or serious injury of officers involved with their use—be it preparing for deployment, executing deployment, or post-deployment retrieval. Already, after just four months, 2020 has proven to be no different. These tragedies should make us rethink how we end high speed chases. Before diving into this subject, I will admit that in my younger years I, too, placed myself in some “risky” situations while deploying TDDs. If the suspect’s vehicle had swerved one way or another, I most likely would have become another statistic. I was lucky. 

Since 2000, an alarming number of officers have been killed during TDD-related incidents. Of those, over half were killed during some step of employing the devices on an interstate or state highway. In many cases, the suspect’s vehicle was traveling at very high speed, with one documented case of two female suspects traveling in excess of 140 M.P.H. when they struck and killed two police officers in Tennessee.

The risks of TDDs are inherently obvious and steps to mitigate those risks vary; from restricting use to complete prohibition. Cincinnati Police Department implemented a restrictive route after a young sergeant was hit by a pickup truck that was struck by a vehicle driven by a suspect who was high on heroin and fleeing police. The sergeant was in a coma for more than a week and sustained multiple serious injuries including a traumatic brain injury, a broken skull, fractured neck and a dissected carotid artery. He spent a year in a rehab center and ultimately took a medical disability retirement from the department.

The Dallas Police Department chose a more preemptive course of action, completely banning the use of TDDs several years ago. Although at the time of the decision, no Dallas officers had been injured or killed using the devices, but then Assistant Chief Mike Genovesi said, “It’s an officer safety issue. In a perfect world, they can be effective, but I have seen too many instances where the reality we live in is far from that. There’s a lot of danger, a lot of safety issues with them.”

Regardless of the chosen policy, I’m sure we can all agree on one thing. If your officers are given the option to use TDDs, they MUST be trained. That leads to the core question: How much training do we actually conduct on proper TDD deployment? In fact, how much training do we conduct—period—in a profession with so much risk?

While researching this article, I reviewed an instructor’s manual from a popular TDD manufacturer. The manual discusses how to deploy the device and even recommends having “all participants go to a controlled area (i.e., parking lot, large room, etc.) to demonstrate their proficiency in safely deploying…”

Herein lies the problem with not just TDDs, but the majority of our high risk/low frequency tasks in law enforcement. Out of the 30 officers killed in the last 20 years deploying TDDs, none of them were killed in a parking lot with no traffic, and certainly none were killed in a large room.

Are we failing our officers? You bet!

How many times have you heard an administrator, politician, community activist, or member of the media comment on the need to change law enforcement training? Yet, what’s our response? Making virtually no changes that will have a significant impact on the safety and lives of our officers. Of course, I admit there are certainly exceptions to this. However, when you look at our profession from a 30,000-foot view, what are we doing to combat the true risks our officers face on the streets? Are we incorporating reality and appropriate levels of stress into our training curriculums? Having officers deploy TDDs in a large room or a vacant parking lot will only contribute to the problem. These unrealistic settings will not prepare them to deal with the sudden onset of acute stress – which is exactly what occurs during a high-speed pursuit.

Many agencies have been using PIT maneuvers and rolling roadblocks for decades. However, in some departments these actions are prohibited and violate policy. Why would we allow officers to chase a suspect for miles and miles when a properly performed PIT maneuver could end the threat almost immediately? Liability? Fear of damage to a police cruiser and replacing a bumper? Seriously?

This is the issue. As leaders, we have to change the way we think. (By the way, for those of you utilizing the PIT and/or rolling roadblocks, kudos)! The cost to replace a bumper or fix damage to a police car is nothing compared to burying a police officer.

Legislative changes need to be enacted in parts of the country that make fleeing from the police – regardless of the crime, distance, speed, or suspect’s past – a crime that immediately results in mandatory prison time. Send a message to those who flee: your actions will make jail time certain.

If you are going to continue utilizing TDDs, here are some tips and reminders on do’s and don’ts for deployment:

  • Under no circumstances should TDDs be used on Interstate highways. NO EXCEPTIONS!
  • Officers should be cognizant of the lack of visibility when deploying TDDs at night or in adverse weather conditions.
  • Agencies should prohibit the use of TDDs when suspect speeds become excessive.
  • Any officer preparing to deploy a TDD should confirm that pursuing units are aware of his/her location and significantly reduce their speed when approaching the location of the TDDs.
  • If a suspect vehicle successfully “hits” the TDDs, the officer deploying the TDD should immediately notify the pursuing units and advise when the TDDs and involved officers have cleared the roadway, making it safe to pass the location.

Fortunately, the overwhelming majority of TDD deployments are successful and officers take the violators into custody. Therefore, TDDs will most likely continue to be a tool utilized by many law enforcement agencies. Technology is also improving and new tools are being developed to assist law enforcement in apprehending fleeing vehicles. From GPS tracking darts to remote controlled TDDs, we are making improvements in ways to successfully end high speed chases.

A fellow chief who I hold in high regard shared one of the most profound statements I’ve heard in my career:

“Risk is baked into the cake of law enforcement.”

That simple observation stuck with me. We’ve all chosen to eat the cake. It’s what we do. But the deeper you bite in, the more risk you choose to accept. I’m not saying that’s a bad decision. It’s not. But it’s a decision we need to make wisely and with great planning.

The key is training. If you choose to prohibit the use of TDDs, I respect and understand that decision. If you choose to continue to allow your officers the option of using TDDs, then train them! Train them WELL, while seriously considering steps you can take as an administrator to mitigate the risks they may not fully consider in real-time in the field.

Be safe, be smart, be successful!

 

Let the Bidding Begin: Dishing Out Relief Auction to Benefit Texas Restaurants

DALLAS, April 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Texas Restaurant Association (TRA), the leading business association for Texas’ $70.6 billion food service industry, has teamed up with Dallas-based digital marketing firm Lux214 Media Group to fund the TX Restaurant Relief Fund through a week-long online auction.

The auction consists of exclusive chef and food experiences, gift certificates, products, memorabilia, and much more. All proceeds from the auction will benefit the TX Restaurant Relief Fund, which was established in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that has created a challenge of catastrophic magnitude for the restaurant industry. In Texas, the pandemic has caused 688,000 job losses, $80 billion in lost sales revenue, and has caused 34% of Texas’ 50,000 restaurants to close since March 15.

“Our team is working hard to put critical funds directly into the hands of the Texas restaurant communities’ most vulnerable population, independent restaurant owners, which in turn will help to save the jobs of the workers they employ,” said Dr. Emily Williams Knight, TRA President and CEO. “Restaurants in Texas are facing a catastrophe unlike we’ve ever seen. We are inspired by their determination and appreciate the support from our partners as we work to save restaurants.”

The auction is open to everyone – industry and the general public – and will also accept direct donations. The online auction can be seen at DishingOutRelief.com.

The bidding began Wednesday, April 29 at midnight and will end on Wednesday, May 6, at midnight. Items up for bidding range in price from $25 to $20,000. Items up for bidding include:

  • Wolfgang Puck autographed chef jacket
  • 5 course private dinner for 10 by Chef Stephan Pyles
  • Courtside Dallas Mavericks tickets and photo with player
  • Dinner party for 10 with Chef Kent Rathbun at private residence
  • Front Burner home dinner party experience with Chefs from Ida Claire, Mexican Sugar and Whiskey Cake
  • A year’s supply of Vital Farms Eggs
  • Lucchese Bootmaker gift card for $500
  • A private in-home wine tasting presented by Court of Master Sommelier Certified Professional
  • Tickets to sporting events
  • Gift Cards
  • Much more

“This is a cause that hits really close to home for me,” said Donna Tanner, co-founder of Lux214 Media Group and an executive in the restaurant industry in Texas for more than 30 years. “When the opportunity presented itself for our firm to help, we jumped at the chance. The money raised in this auction is going to pump some much-needed life into a multi-billion-dollar industry in Texas that desperately needs it.”

TRA has set a goal to raise a minimum of $10 million for the fund and Lux214 Media group hopes that this auction will help them reach that goal and support as many of Texas’ independently owned restaurants as possible. The objective is to provide immediate relief by getting the money to restaurants quickly.

“It is critical that people from all across Texas come together in solidarity to help in this time of crisis,” said Chef Stephan Pyles. “It is not only crucial for the economy in our great state, but for our culture. The funds we raise from this auction will make a significant impact on saving the restaurant industry in Texas, and by doing so, will be saving our culture and unique traditions.”

Governor Abbott Temporarily Allows For Appearance Before Notary Public Via Videoconference For Real-Estate Instruments

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AUSTIN – Governor Greg Abbott has suspended a statute concerning appearance before a notary public to acknowledge real-estate instruments such as mortgages. This suspension temporarily allows for appearance before a notary public via videoconference when executing such documents, avoiding the need for in-person contact during the COVID-19 pandemic. The conditions that will apply whenever this suspension is invoked can be found here.

“Texas is providing flexibility in the notarization process by way of this temporary suspension to ensure Texans can continue to stay home as much as possible to keep themselves and others safe,” said Governor Abbott. “Allowing for appearance before a notary public via videoconference will aid in our continued efforts to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and protect public health.”

This suspension will remain in effect until the earlier of May 30, 2020, or until the March 13, 2020 disaster declaration is lifted or expires. Documents executed while this suspension is in effect, and in accordance with its terms, will remain valid after the termination of this suspension.

Grapevine Walgreens goes back to normal business hours

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Hey Grapevine! As of yesterday (4/28), Walgreens has gone back to their pre-COVID hours. They are open from 6am – Midnight again.

Location: 912 W Northwest Hwy, Grapevine Texas 76051

Phone: (817) 310-3072

Website

They have paper products in stock and all employees are requited to wear masks and gloves. Social distancing markers are still in place.

Texas businesses can begin reopening Friday. Here are answers to key questions about the governor’s plan

By  and 

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(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Some businesses in North Texas will reopen this week because Gov. Greg Abbott has announced he’ll let his executive order requiring Texans to stay at home expire Thursday.

His three-phase plan to reopen the state will begin Friday, when malls, restaurants and movie theaters can reopen if they follow certain procedures.

Here are some answers to common questions about phase one of the governor’s plan.

Read more from The Dallas Morning News…

Grapevine shops are opening in a limited way; Support our local businesses

Screen Shot 2020-04-26 at 6.47.33 PMPursuant to Executive Order GA-16, issued on Friday, April 17, 2020, by Governor Greg Abbott and effective at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, April 24, 2020, some retail businesses classified as non-essential in the original “Stay-at-Home” order will be able to provide “To-Go” services with some restrictions.

Any non-essential business that chooses to reopen to utilize the “Retail-to-Go” system must follow the guidelines outlined by the Texas Department of State Health Services for the safety of employees and customers:

  • Customers will not be allowed inside any store/establishment.
  • Customers may purchase items from a participating retail store for pick-up, delivery by mail, or delivery to doorstep.
  • All payments must be conducted over the phone or the internet (if not possible, contact must be minimized).
  • Purchased items should be delivered/placed inside the customer’s trunk or backseat to minimize contact.
    • Items delivered to a home should be delivered to the front doorstep. Delivery personnel is not allowed to enter a residence.

Retail delivery by mail:

  • All payments must be done over the phone or the internet.
  • Purchased items should be delivered by mail without customer contact.
  • All customers should wash or sanitize their hands after any transaction.

View Governor Abbott’s Executive Order number GA-16. View the COVID-19 Guidance for employers, employees, and customers of reopened retails services provided by the Texas Department of State Health Services. View our Shop Local map.

With a high emphasis on social distancing and avoiding large crowds, the Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau has put together a list of Retail Stores and their respective hours of operation, online shopping availability and ability to purchase gift cards or gift certificates so you can pay it forward!

GUIDE: Know when and where to grocery shop in Grapevine, Colleyville, Southlake during the pandemic

By Gavin Pugh 

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(Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake grocery stores are finding ways to offer food to everyone while also attempting to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Innovations include online ordering, curbside pickup, direct delivery and senior hours.

Here is an interactive map with updated hours and other details on local grocery stores. This list is not comprehensive, but it will be updated regularly.

To alert our news staff about potential updates, email gcsnews@communityimpact.com.

Continue reading at Community Impact…

Report: Blue Angels to fly over San Antonio to honor healthcare workers


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(Photo: U.S. Navy via MGN Online)

Read more from News4SA…

Grand Prairie NAACP delivers PPEs to local businesses

NAACP LogoI may have mentioned that I volunteer for a number of non-profits around the area. One of them is the Grand Prairie Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (GP NAACP).

We recently reached out to local and area businesses and inquired about their need for Personal Protection Equipment (PPE). On April 21, we handed out gloves and masks to the the businesses who, though word-of-mouth, the Facebook page or email, requested them. PPEs were also handed out to the homeless and the poor in the Dalworth neighborhood, where Chapter President Angela Luckey grew up.

As of April 21, Grand Prairie has had 109 COVID-19 cases; Dallas County (the part that Grand Prairie is in) has had 65 cases and two deaths; and Tarrant County (Grand Prairie is also part of this county) has had 44 cases and one death.

PJ“The Grand Prairie NAACP is helping our essential business employees, healthcare workers and residents here in Grand Prairie,” said Chapter President Angela Luckey. “We are helping them to keep safe by providing them with masks and gloves. We also want to help one another find ways to ensure all people get tested for Coronavirus in Grand Prairie.”

Volunteers Phyllis Johnson and myself delivered to the businesses who reached out, as well as to homes of people who couldn’t leave their residence because of a medical condition, or whose caretaker did not have the proper protection.

Volunteer Phyllis Johnson said, “It is a privilege to be a part of an organization that focuses on helping the community, especially the minority community. To help distribute masks and gloves to small businesses in Grand Prairie, in order to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, was a heartwarming experience. People are in need. The recipients were so grateful for our efforts. One elderly lady stated she was grateful for the work that the NAACP is doing in the community.“

I had fun delivering to a couple of businesses. Their reactions were priceless. As we all probably know, PPEs are hard to find sometimes, or are just really expensive. Yet, they are required for many essential businesses. So the bags of gloves and masks, which any kid would hate to unwrap at Christmas, were received with relief and smiles.

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Me, all decked out

ABOUT NAACP:

Founded on February 12, 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest, largest and most widely recognized grassroots-based civil rights organization. It has more than a half-million members and supporters throughout the United States and the world and are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, campaigning for equal opportunity and conducting voter mobilization.

The NAACP has been working toward racial equality ever since its inception. They operate on the belief that racial segregation and discrimination limit and diminish human potential, ultimately denying the full benefits of freedom to African Americans and other minorities. The NAACP has been at the forefront of the struggle to eliminate racial disparities in the criminal justice system for decades.

In 1925, the NAACP provided legal representation for Dr. Ossian Sweet, out of Michigan, who was facing a mob of angry white people after moving into an all-white neighborhood. When the mob attacked his home, one person perished. Dr. Sweet and his brother were charged with murder.

Famed attorney Clarence Darrow, retained by the NAACP, represented Mr. Sweet. The first trial ended in a mistrial when an all-white jury could not agree. The second trial ended in a “not guilty” verdict. This early NAACP-supported case coined the phrase, “A man’s home is his castle.”

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Volunteer Phyllis Johnson (L) and Chapter President Angela Luckey get ready for PPE deliveries

The Grand Prairie Chapter of the NAACP will continue to work with their partners to bring some relief, and hopefully some smiles, to the Grand Prairie area, minority of not. “We are all inclusive,” said Luckey.