Category Archives: American Airlines

American Airlines Named Top Faith-Friendly Workplace in the Nation Due to Interfaith Ministry Programs

The work floor of AA’s Integrated Operations Center

American Airlines (AA), based out of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), made history this month as the number one faith-friendly workplace among Fortune 500 companies in the nation. The airline clinched the top spot via the 2022 Corporate Religious Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) Index, and the AA Interfaith Family was honored at a gala at the Religious Freedom and Business Foundation’s (RFBF) 3rd annual Faith@Work ERG Conference in Washington D.C. on May 23 – 25.

This annual event focuses on Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) and chaplains that are blazing trails within corporate America. The Conference brings these groups and employees together so they can interact and share strategies and Best Practices, with the goal of improving and expanding interfaith programs across the nation and the globe.

Read more from NewsBreak…

American Airlines and OSU-Tulsa host Girls in Aviation Day

More than 100 young women attended the Girls in Aviation Day event to learn about the exciting field of aviation. (Photo: AA)

FORT WORTH, Texas — American Airlines and Oklahoma State University-Tulsa (OSU) joined together to host the first Girls in Aviation Day this past weekend. Held at American Airlines Hangar 80, located at the airline’s Base Maintenance facility in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the Women in Aviation International event focuses on introducing young girls to the exciting field of aviation, educating them on career opportunities, and bringing awareness to the many diverse fields within the industry — all areas American is keenly focused on.

“American Airlines has so many great opportunities to offer the next generation of aviation professionals,” said Stacey Brown, Director of Aircraft Overhaul at Tulsa. “It’s important we capture these young women early so they can see first-hand the many career opportunities that await them. The City of Tulsa has long played a critical role in American’s success, and we’re excited to connect with these impressive and aspiring aviation professionals from this important community.”

Read more from AA Newsroom…

American Airlines Offers Some Passengers a Menu of Discounts

For those of you, like me, had gotten really disappointed with most airlines’ baggage costs, American Airlines has adopted a new policy.

Started on Feb. 26, the airline changed its baggage allowance policies so that customers to have a more consistent and transparent booking experience. No more showing up at the airport and being surprised by fees that were not advertised!

These changes include:

  • Premium Economy tickets will include two free checked bags on all routes where American provides their new enhanced travel experience.
  • Main Cabin tickets on all multiple – hour international routes will include one free checked bag.
  • American will be the first airline to offer international travelers to Asia, Oceania, India and Israel a Basic Economy Plus Bag ticket, which provides the low price of a non-changeable fare with a free checked bag.
  • Agencies who use this new distribution capability (NDC) will be able to offer customers new packaged fares and corporate experiences, such as certain seats, bags and privileges together at the time of booking [packaged trip incentives].

So, while this may not apply to everyone, the folks it DOES apply to should have a cheaper, more convenient and quicker experience, from booking a ticket to landing at their destination.

Hopefully soon, American will include a free checked bag or bags in the near future for domestic flights. [HINT, HINT, American!]

Planning for Vaccine Distribution: DFW Airport, American Airlines Make Dallas-Fort Worth an Ideal Gateway

As a COVID-19 vaccine inches closer to becoming available in the U.S., Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is poised to serve as a key player in the “biggest product launch” in history.

The Dallas region’s central location, transportation infrastructure, and connectivity—combined with DFW International Airport and American Airlines’ cargo network and expertise in handling time- and temperature-sensitive products—make North Texas the ideal gateway for this massive logistical effort.

Cargo and Cold Chain Infrastructure

DFW International Airport’s cargo operations serve 22 major cargo hubs throughout Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. DFW handles 54% of air cargo from Texas, generating more than $20 billion and accounting for nearly 55% of the airport’s total annual regional economic impact.

DFW opened its cold chain facility in October 2017, enabling it to handle temperature-sensitive products ranging from fruits, flowers, and fish, to pharmaceutical and life sciences products. Since then, the airside cold chain facility experienced a 20% increase in pharma shipments.

“DFW Airport is proud to be one of just two airports in the U.S. to obtain IATA CEIV Pharma community status,” said Milton De La Paz, DFW International Airport Vice President of Airline Relations and Cargo Business Development. “DFW is also the first airport in North America to have both an IATA CEIV Pharma community and a cloud-based air cargo community system, which enables collaborative data sharing of cargo shipments across all stakeholders in the supply chain.”

Read more from Dallas Innovates…

Preparing for a Vaccine: American Cargo Operations Conducting Trial Flights From Miami to South America

FORT WORTH, Texas — The American Airlines Cargo team is preparing for its critical role in transporting the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine once approved. In mid-November, American’s cargo operation began conducting trial flights, in conjunction with pharmaceutical and cargo partners, from Miami to South America on its Boeing 777-200 aircraft. The trial flights simulate the conditions required for the COVID-19 vaccine to stress test the thermal packaging and operational handling process that will ultimately ensure it remains stable as it moves across the globe.

While the situation will be unique, the task is not new to American — the airline’s cargo operation has been shipping life-saving medicine for more than eight decades. Since the beginning of the pandemic, American has been transporting hundreds of thousands of pounds of personal protective equipment (PPE), medical equipment, COVID-19 test kits and pharmaceuticals to help battle the coronavirus. As a recognized expert in cold chain logistics, American has been involved in transporting components for Phase III COVID-19 vaccine trials, including quickly and safely carrying test vaccines and specimens to research facilities around the world.

Read more from American Airlines…

American Airlines Boosts Its Clean Commitment With Sustained Virus-Killing Coating to Help Safeguard Customers From Coronavirus

americanLogoFORT WORTH, Texas — American Airlines is upgrading its Clean Commitment by adding the electrostatic spraying solution SurfaceWise®2 from Allied BioScience to its multitiered cleaning and safety program in the coming months. The SurfaceWise2 solution is the first-ever long-lasting product to help fight the spread of the novel coronavirus that is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“The American Airlines Clean Commitment is our promise that we’re taking bold measures and using the latest products and technology to help ensure our customers’ well-being when they travel with us,” said David Seymour, American’s Chief Operating Officer. “Thanks to rigorous evaluations conducted by the experienced professionals at the EPA, the American Airlines team and Allied BioScience, our multitiered program will become even stronger at safeguarding our customers and team members from virus such as coronavirus and the flu.”

“SurfaceWise2’s long-lasting defense provides a layer of protection against viruses not offered by any other solutions on the market,” said Maha El-Sayed, PhD, Allied BioScience Chief Science Officer. We look forward to also seeing SurfaceWise2 used in offices, schools, gymnasiums and other high-traffic areas to support the nation in safely reopening.”

In the coming months, American will begin using SurfaceWise2 for electrostatic spraying on surfaces inside its aircraft with plans to use the product throughout its entire fleet, including those in its American Eagle regional partners. Other elements of the airline’s multitiered Clean Commitment, include enhanced aircraft cleaning performed before every mainline flight and an even deeper overnight cleaning.

“SurfaceWise2 creates an invisible barrier on surfaces, which physically breaks down and kills virus cells,” said Dr. Charles Gerba, a leading infectious disease expert. “This helps protect passengers and crew members against the transmission of coronavirus via surfaces, particularly on high-touch areas such as seats, armrests, tray tables and overhead bin doors.”

High-efficiency particulate air (commonly known as HEPA) filters have purified the air on American’s entire mainline fleet — and most regional jets — since the late 1990s. HEPA technology is also used in hospitals and medical facilities around the world, helping keep medical environments clear of bacteria and viruses while providing clean air.

American continues to build on its commitment to the safety and well-being of its customers and team members throughout their travel journey. The airline has implemented multiple layers of protection, including enhanced cleaning of American’s spaces in airports and its airplanes and enforcement of its face coverings policy. Only those under the age of 2 are exempt from wearing a face covering while traveling with American.

American has expanded the frequency of cleaning in airport areas under its control, including gate areas, ticket counters, passenger service counters, baggage service offices and team member rooms. Customers on every flight receive sanitizing wipes or gel, and American has also limited food and beverage delivery on board aircraft to reduce touchpoints between flight attendants and customers.

In addition to using SurfaceWise2 as its new electrostatic spraying solution in the coming months, every mainline aircraft is disinfected at every turn, including hand-cleaning seat buckles, seats, tray table and numerous other surfaces. Located in the seatback pocket, American Way magazine is now printed with a new paper treatment process called Biomaster®, which is an antimicrobial technology that helps prevent the growth of unwanted microbes.

American continues to work with the Global Biorisk Advisory Council for GBAC STAR® Accreditation for its fleet of aircraft and customer lounges. American is the first airline to seek GBAC STAR accreditation and expects to receive the designation by the end of 2020.

For more information, click HERE.

Inaugural national conference emphasizes including faith in the workplace

By Stacey Doud and Father Greg McBrayer

The Busch School of Business at the Catholic University of America (CUA) and the Religious Freedom & Business Foundation (RFBF) hosted the inaugural national conference for faith-oriented Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) on February 13-14, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Faith@WorkThe historic event brought together Employee Resource Group (ERG) leaders from across corporate America to share their experiences, their outlook for the future and ideas for furthering the trend toward a wider acceptance of faith-based ERGs. This movement is going full speed at some of America’s largest and most familiar companies, including DFW’s own American Airlines (AA), which tied for number 5 with Facebook on the new Religious Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Index (REDI).

Father Greg McBrayer, who is a Chief Flight Dispatcher and Anglican Priest, serves as the Senior Christian Employee Business Resource Group (CEBRG) Diversity Advisory Council Representative at American Airlines.

“My role is to both oversee and plant new Christian Ministry Chapters within AA worldwide, which exist under the oversight of the Inclusion and Diversity Department,” McBrayer said.

McBrayer on TV Interview

McBrayer being interviewed by Currents TV

At AA for over 40 years, McBrayer has been involved in the faith movement in the aviation industry for 20 years. He also oversees the Board of Directors at DFW Airport Interfaith Chaplaincy, which has 15 volunteer chaplains from all three major faith groups [Christian, Jewish and Muslim] that provide the ministry of presence and chapel services at DFW Airport daily.

The phrase most emphasized at the conference was, “I want to bring my whole, true self to work.” And faith is a large part of many workers’ personal identities. But if their workplaces don’t support this part of who they are, the results can be as severe as failure to perform job duties, excessive absences, resignation/termination and at the far end of the spectrum, lawsuits.

McBrayerAndFriends

Father McBrayer listens to a presentation, along with other faith leaders from American Airlines

“We find our faith at the foundation of who we are. So, to bring that into the workplace, where we deal with the anxieties and stresses of our jobs and professions, is absolutely needed,” McBrayer said.

An objective measure of corporate diversity for faith was created by the Religious Freedom & Business Foundation. It is called the corporate Religious Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Index, or the REDI, Index. The other nine corporations (excluding AA) recognized at this first-time event were: Alphabet/Google, Tyson Foods, Intel, Target, Facebook, Apple, Dell, Goldman Sachs and American Express.

REDI-Top-10-Index-Scores

The REDI Index is the first benchmark for the objective assessment of the state of America’s Corporate inclusion of religion as part of its diversity, equity and inclusion programs and initiatives. It uses practices to make sure the Index comes out objectively, including double-blind coding [counting and categorization] of the main diversity landing pages of Fortune 100 companies and other data. From this information, the REDI Index is constructed.

The latest findings are disappointing. Many corporations still overlook religious inclusion, while paying attention to other diversity classifications, such as race/ethnicity, women/gender, sexual orientation, veterans/military, disability, age, and family, by a factor of 34-to-1. Several corporations have already been through expensive lawsuits.

Hilton paid $21 million in 2019 to a dishwasher because Hilton did not reasonably accommodate his religious needs. Abercrombie & Fitch was taken to the Supreme Court in 2015, in which the plaintiff accused the corporation of putting their “looks policy” above religious freedom and indiscrimination. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the plaintiff, who just wanted to wear a hijab to work.

The analysis done by the RFBF determines that only 43 of the Fortune 100 companies in the U.S. even mention religion on their company diversity sections of their corporate websites.

Only about half of the 43 companies that do mention religion only bring it up once, as a part of a boilerplate nondiscrimination statement.

Brian Grim, PhD, president of the Religious Freedom & Business Foundation, which was created in 2014, had some hopeful news.

“Our research, however, also indicates that corporate America is at a tipping point toward giving religion similar attention to that given the other major diversity categories, especially as our nation is becoming more religiously diverse with no one religious denomination holding a majority. Indeed, including religion is a litmus test for whether a company fully embraces diversity, equity and inclusion. This conference has shown the world that faith is welcome inside of corporate America,” Grim said.

McBrayerPlaque

McBrayer (L) accepts a plaque on behalf of American Airlines from Brian Grim

American Airlines is evidence of employee identity inclusion. The new religious-freedom rankings come after years of the corporation’s strong support of other CRG groups. “This is a very exciting season for our faith based EBRG’s and I am very proud of what I see occurring within American Airlines,” said Father McBrayer. 

“The perception out there is that religion is a dangerous topic, but some companies have found the opposite – that it reinforces the other things they care about,” Grim said.

“Companies considering faith-based initiatives should strive to ensure they are inclusive,” said Nick Fish, president of American Atheists, “Creating a work environment that is exclusionary of non-religious staff or members of religious minorities is a recipe for disaster.”

This historic Religious Freedom and Business Foundation gathering at CUA has already set the 2021 date to convene again next year, which clearly indicates the growth of this movement in corporate America to provide opportunities for employees to bring their whole selves to the work, including their faith.