Category Archives: Safety

OPINION: The History of School Shootings in the U.S. and How to Find Protection for Parents, Teachers, and Children

The following article is based on the opinion of the author and does not necessarily reflect the views of NewsBreak or Particle Media, Inc.

Most people over 30 remember the Columbine and Sandy Hook “active shooter events (ASE),” which collectively claimed the lives of 32 students and seven teachers. The latest ASE happened at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX (near San Antonio) on May 24. This bad guy killed 19 kids and two teachers.

While it may seem that these school shootings are something that started in the 20th century, the United States has seen this type of violence as far back as 1891, when a man fired on a group of teachers and students that were at an exhibition in Liberty, Mississippi with a double-barreled shotgun. Over 14 people were wounded. That same year, a 70-year-old man opened fire on students in a parochial school in New York. Fortunately, everyone survived.

Read more from NewsBreak…

TikTok Trend Could End in Tragedy for Teens

Photo: Twitter

How many “Children of the 80s” remember the prank called, “Ding, Dong, Ditch?” It consisted of going from residence to residence after dark, either ringing the doorbell, knocking on the door, or both, then running away as fast as possible. Classmates’, teachers’, and friends’ houses tended to be the most fun, as the pranksters were usually not far away, observing who came to the door and the reaction that the caper elicited.

That was decades ago, when people usually didn’t answer the door with a weapon close at hand, and pranksters generally didn’t “hit” the same house twice because of the fear of getting busted.

Back then, most kids (of course, there are exceptions) didn’t really want to ever see the inside of a cop car or a jail cell, and they certainly weren’t angling for violence. They wanted something to do that made them giggle, yet was generally harmless.

Read more from NewsBreak…

SAVE THE DATE: Next National Drug Take-Back Day is April 30

Do you have prescription bottles with meds that are either outdated or that you no longer use? Did you know that throwing them away not only gives potential thieves your personal information, but may also contribute to the stock of street drugs? Did you know that flushing them down the toilet can contribute to city water contamination?

No matter your answers, keep in mind that the next National Drug Take-Back Day, sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), will be on Saturday, April 30 from 10am to 2pm in the front parking lot of the Grapevine Public Safety Building, located at 1007 Ira E. Woods Avenue.

You can bring your unused or expired medications (no liquids, aerosols, or sharps, please) to be safely disposed of, as well as any papers with your personal information on them to be shredded (provided by Data Shredding Services).

TSA Federal Face Mask Requirement for Public Transit Extended through April 18

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) extended the face mask requirement (SD 1582/84-21-01D) for individuals across all transportation networks throughout the United States, including at airports, on board commercial aircraft, on over-the-road buses, and on commuter bus and rail systems through April 18, 2022.

Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) will continue to require a CDC approved face mask to be worn over the mouth and nose by passengers, operators, and contractors at all times while on DART vehicles including buses, trains, and paratransit vehicles, Trinity Railway Express trains, in buildings and onboard the Dallas Streetcar.

Refusing to wear a mask, unless exempted or excluded under the CDC guidelines, is a violation of federal law and failure to comply will result in denial of boarding or removal, and passengers may be subject to federal penalties, including a fine ranging from $500 for the first offense up to $3,000 for repeat offenders.

Face masks and hand sanitizer dispensers are installed on buses, light rail vehicles, TRE vehicles, and Dallas streetcars, and will continue to be available to all passengers.

If a DART passenger is concerned with someone not wearing a mask, they can contact DART Customer Service at (214) 979-1111, or use the “DART Say Something” app, which can be downloaded from the Apple Store or Google Play for free.

Staying Safe While Riding DART

DART remains committed to doing everything possible to keep both our patrons and employees safe through this pandemic. The agency remains in close contact with local, state, and national health authorities, including the Texas Department of State Health Services and the CDC. DART encourages passengers who feel sick or are experiencing symptoms to stay home and avoid public places.

Cleaning and Protection

DART continues to undertake aggressive agency-wide cleaning and safety protocols on buses, light rail, paratransit vehicles and properties. In addition to thorough nightly cleanings, DART buses and trains are also cleaned on a rotating basis with hydrogen peroxide-based cleaning solutions to sanitize and disinfect each vehicle.

Social Distancing

DART recommends maintaining a six-foot distance between both fellow riders and your DART operator, leaving an open seat between yourself and other riders when available, avoiding large groups, and staying home if you feel sick or are experiencing symptoms.

You can find more information about how DART is working to keep our passengers safe at www.dart.org/health.

Woman found buried under Texas home sent text message for help; police believe more women were victimized

Photo: KHOU.com

FORT WORTH, Texas — We are learning new details about the Arlington woman who was found buried under a Fort Worth home. For the first time, WFAA is hearing from a family friend who gave us insight into what happened days before her murder.

At 26 years old, Marissa Grimes did everything to be that perfect mother to her two children.

Read more at www.khou.com.

[Editors’ Note: Our hearts and prayers go out to the Grimes family and their friends.]

Local resident warns about tire vandals

Pay attention to your vehicle before driving for the first time each day!

From NextDoor:

DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Brings in Nearly 745,000 Pounds of Unneeded Medications, Continues Fight Against Opioid Epidemic

DALLAS – The Drug Enforcement Administration, along with its law enforcement partners, has removed close to 745,000 pounds of unneeded prescriptions from medicine cabinets across the country as part of DEA’s ongoing commitment to turn the tide against the U.S. opioid epidemic. Following last month’s 21st National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, the program has removed more than 15.2 million pounds of medication from circulation since its inception.

On October 23, with close to 5,000 collection sites nationwide, DEA and its more than 4,200 state and local law enforcement partners came together to help the public rid their homes of unneeded medications—those that are old, unwanted, or no longer needed—that too often become a gateway to addiction. These efforts align directly with DEA’s priority to combat the rise of overdoses plaguing the United States.

On October 23, the Dallas Field Division collected close to 32,000 pounds of unwanted, unused, or expired prescription medications in North Texas and Oklahoma. The DEA Dallas Field Division had over 170 sites with more than 140 local law enforcement partners.

According to a report published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a majority of people who misused a prescription medication obtained the medicine from a family member or friend. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that last year, more than 93,000 people died of drug overdoses in the United States, marking the largest number of drug-related deaths ever recorded in a year. Opioid-related deaths accounted for 75 percent of all overdose deaths in 2020.

“On DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, communities across America came together to rid medicine cabinets of unneeded medications, helping to prevent prescription drug misuse,” said DEA Administrator Anne Milgram. “Take Back Day is a critical effort to curb the historic surge in U.S. overdoses. We know prevention starts at home. The simple step of clearing out medications that are no longer needed makes our homes safer, prevents prescription drug misuse, and, ultimately, can help save lives.”

“The DEA is so pleased with this great turnout and partnership from North Texas and Oklahoma law enforcement and its residence,” said Eduardo A. Chavez, Special Agent in Charge of the DEA Dallas Field Division. “Especially during this pandemic, it is so important to dispose of unneeded prescription drugs. This event helps ensure those drugs don’t fall into the wrong hands.”

DEA’s Take Back Day program is more important than ever before. Last month, DEA issued a Public Safety Alert and launched the “One Pill Can Kill” public awareness campaign to warn Americans of a surge in deadly, fake prescription pills driven by drug traffickers seeking to exploit the U.S. opioid epidemic and prescription pill misuse. Criminal drug networks are shipping chemicals from China to Mexico where they are converted to dangerous substances like fentanyl and methamphetamine and then pressed into pills. The end result—deadly, fake prescription pills—is what these criminal drug networks make and market to prey on Americans for profit. These fake, deadly pills are widely available and deadlier than ever. Fake pills are designed to appear nearly identical to legitimate prescriptions such as Oxycontin®, Percocet®, Vicodin®, Adderall®, Xanax®, and other medicines. Criminal drug
networks are selling these pills through social media, e-commerce, the dark web, and existing distribution networks.

Along with the alert came a warning that the only safe medications are ones prescribed by a trusted medical professional and dispensed by a licensed pharmacist. Any pills that do not meet this standard are unsafe and potentially deadly.

Complete results from DEA’s 21st National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day are available at www.DEATakeBack.com.

For those who missed DEA’s Take Back Day, there are opportunities to regularly and safely dispose of unneeded medications at more than 13,000 pharmacies, hospitals, police departments, and businesses working to help clean out medicine cabinets throughout the year

DEA Holds National Prescription Drug Take Back Dayto Turn the Tide Against the U.S. Opioid Epidemic

DALLAS– The Drug Enforcement Administration will host its 21st National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, October 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event offers free and anonymous disposal of unneeded medications at more than 4,000 local drop-off locations nationwide.

According to a report published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a majority of people who misused a prescription medication obtained the medicine from a family member or friend. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that last year, more than 93,000 people died of drug overdoses in the United States, marking the largest number of drug-related deaths ever recorded in a year. Opioid-related deaths accounted for 75 percent of all overdose deaths in 2020.

For more than a decade, DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day has helped Americans easily rid their homes of unneeded medications—those that are old, unwanted, or no longer needed—that too often become a gateway to addiction. Working in close partnership with local law enforcement, Take Back Day has removed more than 7,000 tons of medication from circulation since its inception. These efforts are directly in line with DEA’s priority to combat the rise of overdoses plaguing the United States.

“The United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic—drug overdoses are up thirty percent over the last year alone and taking more than 250 lives every day,” stated DEA Administrator Anne Milgram. “The majority of opioid addictions in America start with prescription pills found in medicine cabinets at home. What’s worse, criminal drug networks are exploiting the opioid crisis by making and falsely marketing deadly, fake pills as legitimate prescriptions, which are now flooding U.S. communities. One thing is clear: prevention starts at home. I urge Americans to do their part to prevent prescription pill misuse: simply take your unneeded medications to a local collection site. It’s simple, free, anonymous, and it can save a life.”

“Thousands of pounds of unneeded medications are sitting in medicine cabinets, nightstand drawers, and on countertops in homes all across North Texas and Oklahoma,” said Eduardo A. Chávez, Special Agent in Charge of DEA Dallas. “Please help keep them out of the hands of those who might misuse them and out of our waterways and landfills. Visit a site near you to drop them off, easily and anonymously.”

DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is more important than ever before. Last month, DEA issued a Public Safety Alert and launched the One Pill Can Kill public awareness campaign to warn Americans of a surge in deadly, fake prescription pills driven by drug traffickers seeking to exploit the U.S. opioid epidemic and prescription pill misuse. Criminal drug networks are shipping chemicals from China to Mexico where they are converted to dangerous substances like fentanyl and methamphetamine and then pressed into pills. The end result—deadly, fake prescription pills—are what these criminal drug networks make and market to prey on Americans for profit. These fake, deadly pills are widely available and deadlier than ever. Fake pills are designed to appear nearly identical to legitimate prescriptions such as Oxycontin®, Percocet®, Vicodin®, Adderall®, Xanax® and other medicines. Criminal drug networks are selling these pills through social media, e-commerce, the dark web and existing distribution networks.

Along with the alert came a warning that the only safe medications are ones prescribed by a trusted medical professional and dispensed by a licensed pharmacist. Any pills that do not meet this standard are unsafe and potentially deadly. DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day reflects DEA’s commitment to Americans’ safety and health, encouraging the public to remove unneeded medications from their homes as a measure of preventing medication misuse and opioid addiction from ever starting.

On Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021, DEA and its partners will collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of prescription drugs. Liquids (including intravenous solutions), syringes and other sharps, and illicit drugs will not be accepted. DEA will also continue to accept vaping devices and cartridges provided lithium batteries are removed.

A location finder and partner toolbox are available at www.DEATakeBack.com for easy reference to nearby collection sites. Beyond DEA’s Take Back Day, there are also opportunities to regularly and safely dispose of unneeded medications at more than 13,000 pharmacies, hospitals, police departments, and businesses working to help clean out medicine cabinets throughout the year.

American Airlines Boosts Its Clean Commitment With Sustained Virus-Killing Coating to Help Safeguard Customers From Coronavirus

americanLogoFORT WORTH, Texas — American Airlines is upgrading its Clean Commitment by adding the electrostatic spraying solution SurfaceWise®2 from Allied BioScience to its multitiered cleaning and safety program in the coming months. The SurfaceWise2 solution is the first-ever long-lasting product to help fight the spread of the novel coronavirus that is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“The American Airlines Clean Commitment is our promise that we’re taking bold measures and using the latest products and technology to help ensure our customers’ well-being when they travel with us,” said David Seymour, American’s Chief Operating Officer. “Thanks to rigorous evaluations conducted by the experienced professionals at the EPA, the American Airlines team and Allied BioScience, our multitiered program will become even stronger at safeguarding our customers and team members from virus such as coronavirus and the flu.”

“SurfaceWise2’s long-lasting defense provides a layer of protection against viruses not offered by any other solutions on the market,” said Maha El-Sayed, PhD, Allied BioScience Chief Science Officer. We look forward to also seeing SurfaceWise2 used in offices, schools, gymnasiums and other high-traffic areas to support the nation in safely reopening.”

In the coming months, American will begin using SurfaceWise2 for electrostatic spraying on surfaces inside its aircraft with plans to use the product throughout its entire fleet, including those in its American Eagle regional partners. Other elements of the airline’s multitiered Clean Commitment, include enhanced aircraft cleaning performed before every mainline flight and an even deeper overnight cleaning.

“SurfaceWise2 creates an invisible barrier on surfaces, which physically breaks down and kills virus cells,” said Dr. Charles Gerba, a leading infectious disease expert. “This helps protect passengers and crew members against the transmission of coronavirus via surfaces, particularly on high-touch areas such as seats, armrests, tray tables and overhead bin doors.”

High-efficiency particulate air (commonly known as HEPA) filters have purified the air on American’s entire mainline fleet — and most regional jets — since the late 1990s. HEPA technology is also used in hospitals and medical facilities around the world, helping keep medical environments clear of bacteria and viruses while providing clean air.

American continues to build on its commitment to the safety and well-being of its customers and team members throughout their travel journey. The airline has implemented multiple layers of protection, including enhanced cleaning of American’s spaces in airports and its airplanes and enforcement of its face coverings policy. Only those under the age of 2 are exempt from wearing a face covering while traveling with American.

American has expanded the frequency of cleaning in airport areas under its control, including gate areas, ticket counters, passenger service counters, baggage service offices and team member rooms. Customers on every flight receive sanitizing wipes or gel, and American has also limited food and beverage delivery on board aircraft to reduce touchpoints between flight attendants and customers.

In addition to using SurfaceWise2 as its new electrostatic spraying solution in the coming months, every mainline aircraft is disinfected at every turn, including hand-cleaning seat buckles, seats, tray table and numerous other surfaces. Located in the seatback pocket, American Way magazine is now printed with a new paper treatment process called Biomaster®, which is an antimicrobial technology that helps prevent the growth of unwanted microbes.

American continues to work with the Global Biorisk Advisory Council for GBAC STAR® Accreditation for its fleet of aircraft and customer lounges. American is the first airline to seek GBAC STAR accreditation and expects to receive the designation by the end of 2020.

For more information, click HERE.

The City of Fort Worth will host the Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System (CCDS)

Screen Shot 2020-04-29 at 11.29.18 AMThe City of Fort Worth in conjunction with Battelle Memorial Institute, Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council (NCTTRAC) will begin accepting N95 filtration masks that have been used by First Responders or Health Care Professionals. Each mask will be inspected and complete a through decontamination process up to twenty times enhancing the life expectancy of this protective equipment important in the fight against Covid-19.

In order to allow current personal protective equipment (PPE) inventories to continue to stay above minimum numbers the FDA has approved Battelle to decontaminate N95 masks that are routinely considerable disposable. The site in Fort Worth will eventually be able to process up to 80,000 masks every 24 hours. The Battelle/Fort Worth site will serve as a regional hub and serve Texans from the Panhandle to the Piney Woods.

Health Care Organizations and First Responder Agencies will need to register with Battelle to receive information. “We are pleased to partner with a highly recognized organization such as Battelle to help coordinate this process of prolonging our PPE” said Ft. Worth Fire Chief James Davis. “It will allow Fort Worth to help our regional healthcare partners while continuing to provide care and maintain our inventory of N95 masks”.

For further information about Battelle and their process please visit their website at https://www.battelle.org.